The Manhattan Project--2016 A to Z Theme

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Wednesday, September 8, 2010

Work Habits

           I heard him every morning as he got ready for work.  If I had to get up for school I'd see him as he went through his routine.  Like clockwork as they say.  You could count on him being there, going through his routine of preparing for work

           My father and mother made a good team.  She would have his breakfast waiting for him, his lunch at noon, and dinner for the family without fail every night.  I could often hear him singing and being all cheerful in contrast to my I don't want to get up and go to school attitude.  Sometimes there would be a lecture--or at least that's how it came across to me.  Maybe he saw it as pep talks and fatherly advice, but sometimes it was also a reminder of things I needed to do like mow the lawn or something like that.   I was never ready for morning.  He was always raring to go and optimistic about life in general.  My mom kept it all together on the home front.

            I don't remember my father ever staying home sick from work.  He somehow always managed to save sickness for the weekend.   Sickness was not a part of my mother's job description.  She was always there for us no matter what.   Following my father's example I tried my best not to get sick and miss school.

            My parents were sticklers for being on time, following through with commitments, and being true to our word.   They wholeheartedly backed us when we became interested in something, but expected us to be good at what we were doing.  When I wanted to play the violin, they bought the instrument and paid for the lessons.   They also expected me to practice.   My father's philosophy was if you were going to do something, do it right.

            These work ethic principles and general values stuck with me throughout my life.  I've rarely missed work because I was sick.   I try to always be early, never late.  If I tell someone I'm going to do something, I either do it, or if I can't I call ahead and make some kind of arrangements.  I don't ever like to leave anyone in a bad situation because I was irresponsible.

             This is much the way I have approached my blog.  I first have the responsibility to myself to fulfill my blogging goals.  I have committed myself to blogging daily for the first year and I have made every effort to do so, even when it seemed inconvenient or uncomfortable.   I never know if readers will be there, but I make sure my post is up so the readers who do show up will find it just as they have expected it.   Likewise I feel like I have the responsibilities to respond to my comments and to comment on the blogs of those who have commented on mine.   This is what it all comes down to:  Responsibility, reliability, and consistency.

              Who were the role models who have shaped who you are today?   In what way did they do this?  Are your blogging habits an accurate reflection of who you are in your work and social life?  Do you tend to usually be a leader or a follower?  Would  you rather be early or late to work?  An appointment?   A party?  Your own funeral?  

33 comments:

  1. My grandmother was my role model. Everything I do is because I never would want to disappoint her. In fact, she's the one who got me to sit down and write in the first place. That's something which will last me the rest of my life.

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  2. My work ethic was shaped by my step-dad and my father. They both are very hard-working individuals, one an engineer and one a landscaper. One was early to everything, the other one late. lol

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  3. Can I skip my funeral?
    I was a military brat, so that really reflected on my life. I'm not a morning person, but I always arrive early and rarely miss a day due to illness.

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  4. As I don't want to be at my funeral I too will skip that.

    My role model was my mother, being widowed early with 2 children was not easy but she worked hard to provide for us even managed for me to have piano lesson, was a stickler for being punctual, To this day I am always early for appointments. I tried to be the same for my own children but somewhere along the line they found they had minds and thoughts of their own, I love them dearly even if they are late or do something I don't go along with they are after all adults with kids of their own, wonder what my grandchildren will be like?

    Yvonne.

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  5. Oh my goodness Arlee, this took me off guard!
    I would have to say that my grandmother was and still is, even though she is gone, my biggest influence in life. She was so wonderful that I couldn't help but try to emulate her!
    I have always been an early person, never late.
    I only wish that I had the time to comment back to everyone on my blog. I try but most of the time I have too many things to do around here.
    Your childhood reminds me of how my husband and I have raised our own children. The two adult children are now VERY responsible hard workers that take their commitments very seriously.
    Now that my husband is gone most of the time, it has been much harder for me to raise Katie. She is doing good but has been a challenge for me! Which is why I haven't blogged as much as I would like!
    Teenagers, ya gotta love em, right?!
    Love Di ♥

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  6. Yup. Must be on time or early. If you say you are going to do it, then do it. Be trustworthy. Prove to people that they can always count on you. Gosh, I don't know where this came from...my father? All I know is that my husband is the same way. That's why it was really hard for me to cut back from five day blogging to three.

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  7. CHarming as always, the magic of short but effective sentences with a dose of natural refined humour and what I also like in your writing is the absence of pompous, unnecessary and usually snobbish words and terms which wanna-be writers use to give an impression of being educated and enlightened.

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  8. My parents were definitely my role models and still are.

    I am definitely not a morning person, but I'm having problems staying up late as well. I'm in no mans land.

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  9. My father shaped my life very early on as yours did. My work ethic, keeping my word, going the extra mile, etc came from my dad.

    He also worked two just most of the time to provide a lifestyle for us that he never had growing up, never missed a day being sick and never was a slacker.

    Common sense was important to my dad, he had little time with people who couldn't think for themselves, mentally work through a situation or communicate ideas.

    He was independent. Abandoned by his father at an early age, had the run of OK City by the time he was 12 - he made me quite independent.

    Later though, you have probably read my blog on this topic the others who shaped me, shaped me theologically - the puritans, Spurgeon, Pink, MacArthur, Owen, Bridges, etc.

    I think my blogging habits reflect who I am and my work/social life. I work hard on them, want to make the blog attractive, informative, filled with both theological and common sense. I try and blog everyday with something that is meaningful. Even if it is a quote from some dead guy (Phil Johnson's favorite phrase) I want it to speak to the heart.

    My blog's usually post auto, though I have gotten up after midnight to come over to my study and make sure I have a post for the day.

    I am the leader, rarely the follower. If you knew me persoannly you would never ask the four questions.

    30 minutes prior is early, 15 minutes is on time, on time is late, late is unacceptable. I once spent 9 months as an interim pastor, driving over 2 hours, after helping getting 4 young girls ready for church and was never late, often arriving before the locals on the same street as the church.

    I am never late to work, rarely if ever late for an appointment, and always the first to arrive at a party.

    As far as a funeral goes, If I knew where I was going to die, I would never go near the place!

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  10. Jeffrey -- I think that concept of not letting someone down is a big motivational factor for many of us. Even after that person has passed on we sometimes might wish they could see us now or what would they think. Thanks for stopping by Jeffrey.

    J.L. -- So you had the double emphasis on work ethic. I guess with the time thing you are always right one time?

    Alex -- Military ethics can be good for maintaining self-discipline. I'm with you on the funeral.

    Yvonne -- We already know that you and I have a lot in common. I guess our kids do as well. It's way too early to know about grandchildren for me.

    Diana -- I think it's so important for kids to have clear structure in their lives. It makes for a less chaotic undisciplined adulthood.

    Liza -- Agree with you in all this. And it helps if a spouse shares these values. Less conflict for sure.

    Dezmond -- Thank you for your encouragement, Dez. All I know is I like to write in the style I prefer to read. I want passages to flow and I don't like to get bogged down trying to figure out what someone is trying to say.

    Patti -- I get up early, but I like to stay up late. This means I usually have to take a nap every afternoon.

    Gregg -- Have you been saving the comments you leave? You probably could write a book out of them. I love getting your comments! You definitely have the values and ethics that I can appreciate. A pastor must have leadership qualities since he is leading his flock. They look to you for guidance. I'm praying that you will find a church to lead.

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  11. My father was also big on the if you’re going to do something, do it right philosphy – in fact, I think I heard this so often that it made me fearful to attempt some things, for fear I couldn’t get them right.

    I’m not sure how much my blogging habits reflect on who I am, other than I do try to be consistent although I only blog once a week these days.

    I hate being late for anything, so I usually arrive too early. As for my funeral though, I hope I can break my own rules!

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  12. I'm a night owl, but I am rarely late! My Mom made sure we were on time~ Blog wise, I'm good when life is sort of normal, but when it throws me a curve ball, my routine changes~

    My Dad was a perfectionist and sometimes this
    throws me a curve. I am trying to get over it...

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  13. Jane & Ellie --The fear of not attaining perfection can be so intimidating that we sometimes just don't do it, but I've come to accept that as long as what I do at least is acceptable then it's knowing that I tried and gave it my best shot is what is most important.

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  14. Blogger just told me that the comment service was unavailable, so I hope that I will not be repeating myself, here. Sounds like we were raised by the same parents! I've been known to be fashionably late on more than one occasion. However, I think that consistency is very important. Thanks so much for stopping by and for your nice comment. Cool that you know Lafayette! It's bigger and better than ever,and I wish that you could visit, now!

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  15. Yeah, r-LEE-b, my work ethic was also formed by my parents - folks from an older, more reliable generation.

    Back in my real drinking days, I even went to work with some hellacious hangovers because "you don't call in sick for work - ever!"

    Yeah, my blogging habits are an accurate reflection of who I am.

    I'm certainly no "follower" but I'm a "leader" only to the degree that others choose to follow my lead. And most don't. I guess I'd say I'm more of an "isolationist".

    I'm always just a shade early or else right on time. If I'm going to be late due to circumstances beyond my control, I'll call in advance and say so. I don't just show up late.

    ~ D-FensDogg
    'Loyal American Underground'

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  16. I'm freakishly early to everything. I guess I get it from my mom, she was always 1/2 an hour early to work and from waitering: 15 minutes before your shift starts is on-time. I needed to read this as I try to figure out the frequency of my blogs.

    Alex
    Breakfast Every Hour

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  17. My father was hard working, so I probably learned it from him. And I'm always early. Hate arriving in a rush.

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  18. Marguerite--I always feel like it's fine to bring the unexpected to people as long as you give them what they expect from you (and hopefully they are expecting something good).
    I hope to get back to Lafayette someday. I always enjoyed my visits there.

    StMc -- I've had a few of those show up to work no matter how you feel situations myself. I hate late and I don't like to wait for someone and likewise I wouldn't want somebody having to wait on me.

    Alex -- I'm not sure about the frequency of your blogs, but I'm with you and your mom on the lateness philosophy. Thanks for stopping by.

    L. Diane --I like to get somewhere so I can case the scene and mark my territory. Then when everyone gets there they think I'm an expert in a sense. That's probably why I often come across as a leader. I'd say especially when you are going to a speaking gig you like to be early so you can get more relaxed and scope out your situation.

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  19. I was born four days late, and I haven't caught up yet. It's difficult for me to be 'on time' so as a result I'm usually way early or a few minutes late. Fortunately (?) for me, I married a man who has punctuality down to the second. Go figure.

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  20. I also believe that punctuality should be named a virtue. It comes down to respect, and showing up late or just not bothering to do what you said you would is just an indication of how much you respect that person. My parents weren't perfect, but they always kept their word. Granted, people do sometimes forget things, but you can at least try to remember and not just use that as an excuse. If you don't respect others and the time and effort they put into being there on time, how can you expect them to respect you?

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  21. My mom. She passed 14 years ago, but she's the compass by which I live my life. 'Live strong' was her motto, and I try not to disappoint her even now.

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  22. This is a wonderful post! My mom was and still is my role model. She has never been one to half-ass anything or roll with the crowd. She never cared about what people thought of her. Still doesn't. She works extremely hard for what she has and takes nothing for granted. First to rise and last to sleep. She's amazing. Although, I wish I could be half the woman she is, I try and strive to make her proud every day.

    As for my blogging habits. Well, as new as I am, I'd like to think I'm true to myself. I have as many followers as fingers on both my hands, and I don't mind at all. :) I don't want to be one to follow... to blog only about what I think others would want to read. I want my blog to reflect me... the good and the bad... the bitching and the grateful parts of me. Haha.

    Oh, and I'd rather be real early to something. Like I learned from my time in the military (and growing up a military brat): If you're late, don't come at all; on time, you're late; early, you're on time. ;)

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  23. Carol --I guess often the spouses we pick have certain qualities that we need and they help provide the balance.

    Firecracker -- So nice to see you here. I like your thinking. I guess what you said is what we also know as the Golden Rule. I wish everyone thought like you do on this subject.

    Shellie -- She's probably watching over you. My father passed away 20 years ago on 9/9 and like you I try to do things in my life that I hope he would have approved.

    Michelle -- Thank you for your wonderful comment. Yes, mothers are often quite amazing people and I thank God for mine. A blog that reflects it's author lends itself to setting up relationship. I want to feel a sense of identification with the blogger in that I can learn something that I can apply to my own life or I can feel a sense of commonality. Too personal and egocentric can be bad, but relational is good.

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  24. Dad...I thought the same thing about when you would wake us up in the morning. I never wanted to wake up, but you would always come in my room whistling for me to get up. Maybe when I have kids I'll be the same way, but for now I'll be grumpy in the morning.

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  25. Emilee-- I guess sometimes things change when you have kids. Hopefully you will set a good example for my grandchildren. I think you will.

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  26. Those were a lot of questions Arlee! I like to be efficient so always trying the find a faster, and better way to do things. But I also want to enjoy the journey but 'get done' gets in the way of enjoying doing. It's a balance for sure. Sounds like you had great role models!

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  27. Lynn -- Hello. I trust you had a great summer. I tend to offer several questions so readers can find at least one that they want to answer. You should have seen all of the questions on my Monday post and more amazingly the number of readers who answered all of them.
    I really like your philosophy of getting things done. I try to do things in much the same way.

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  28. My parents must have been much like yours, Arlee, except my dad was a farmer through my high school years. We all worked, and we were expected to meet my dad's standards, from keeping the bean fields clear of weeds to planting straight rows in the garden. I still remember what it felt like to get routed out of bed at dawn to eat breakfast and then head for that darned bean field with a hoe or a weed hook. Office work wasn't bad at all. I worked a lot of hours, was rarely late, and rarely stayed home sick.

    Patricia

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  29. Patricia -- I think a lot of today's generations of young people have missed out on some of those values of old. Hard work and discipline builds character and many kids today don't experience those things.

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  30. A ncie heartfelt post. I can't think of any role models that I had growing up. I tended to be the 'odd one out' of the family when it came to any decision regarding careers, hobbies etc. I'll go with the consensus though, and say that in terms of work ethic my parents had a big impact because they just got on with things without complaint. They saved their grievances for when they had time for them, and that's what I learned.

    I'm definitely an early person as opposed to a late person (though I wouldn't want to be early for my funeral, that would suck :P). You've got a hell of a commitment in blogging every single day, but more power to you for doing so.

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  31. Jamie--Thanks for infusing your ideas into this discussion. I think a lot of parents just quietly accept life, which helps kids keep a better outlook on life. My everyday blog posting will more than likely be ending soon.

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  32. Lee - Thanks for sharing your personal look-back. You're folks were very similar to mine. Honesty, responsibility, a strong work ethic and family bonds along with spiritual beliefs were the basis of my upbringing. I thank every day for having had their parental guidance and role modeling.

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  33. Paula -- Glad you could lend your remembrance as well. Good parental guidance is so important to who we become and the influence we have on others.

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