The Manhattan Project--2016 A to Z Theme

Always a work in progress--welcome to my blog...

Monday, August 23, 2010

Blog Boggled: Comment Conversation

 


E-Mail Update

          The first phase of e-mail management is complete.   Last week's count was 267, and at the time of this record I'd culled it down to 12.   The New e-mail folder should be at around this number at some point each day and rarely be over 100 before emails get deleted or dispersed into folders.  Currently I have 36 folders.  These will eventually be consolidated with others or deleted as I sort through content.  Now as long as I tend to the daily incoming e-mail in a timely manner, I should no longer have the confusing mess of new e-mail to wade through.

                           More About Commenting

            Last Monday I discussed the concept of quality commenting, that is leaving a comment that has content that relates to the blog post.  Today I want to take it a step further and look at commenting as a form of conversation, discussion, and relationship building. 

            Fortunately, Alex J. Cavanaugh's recent post, Blogging Idiosyncrasies Part Two, begins a recent discussion on this topic.  If you haven't read this post yet, and the comments, I encourage you to do so as I am adding my views to that portion of that discussion that relates to commenting.  And there was a lot of input from Alex's readers as to how they felt about the subject of comment.

              The Blog Conversation

            My take on commenting is that it allows a blog reader to interact with the writer and the other readers.   A truly inspiring and interesting comment section has comments of substance and questions when more information is desired; heartfelt replies that either reaffirm the commenter or address the commenter's questions or concerns; acknowledgment from the commenter that the response was received if that response entailed further action like an answer or clarification; and in some instances, input from other commenters.  In other words, an exciting comment section that exudes vitality and community would be like an on-line discussion forum.

           Impractical and idealistic?  Of course!  Last week we already noted that most of us don't have the time for many quality comments, let alone an ongoing discussion.  However, there are some cases when it does happen and it is quite exciting.  I've seen it on my own Thursday Debate Day topics where an actual ongoing debate occurs among some participants of the comment section.  I find it to be educational and stimulating.

          A couple of other sites where I have seen this are Stephen T. McCarthy's FFFF Blog and LC's Back in the USSR.  They often deal with controversial and debate-worthy topics that create a dialogue.  I have seen many other similar sites in the blogosphere, but it's that time factor that gets in the way of following many of these.  Too many fun blogs and not enough play time. 

            Tracking Comments and Replies
 
           But if we are talking just simple dialogue, I do think this can be accomplished even if you are hitting a multitude of blogs each day.  First of all, when you leave a comment, you have the option to "subscribe" to that post so that you will receive an email notification if the owner replies or each time someone else leaves a comment.  It's kind of a nice feeling when you get that note from the blog owner that they got your comment. I usually race through any other comments, but on rare occasions another commenter responds to what I have said and it's nice to know that too, whether it be positive or negative.  It's all a relationship building experience.  I have discovered many wonderful blogs through the comments. Yes, the emails can really pile up, but I can quickly delete them as well.

          As a blog owner, I just have faith that the commenters have subscribed to the post because I almost always reply to comments in my comment section.  I mostly reply in blocks because it just seems more efficient.   Some bloggers like Just Jemi reply one on one, which is a much more personal approach I think. Plus it doubles her comments (although even without her replies she's getting more comments than I usually get) and it sure makes her comment section look impressive.  Jemi's connecting with her readers surely endears her to we who comment on her blog.

             Replying By E-mail

        Some blog owners reply directly by email, which is a nice personal contact, or better yet, reply in the comment section and with a personal email.  I do direct emails in very special instances where my reply is more personal, but I still prefer to share my reply with all readers.  

           Offsite Blog Comments

        Other bloggers may go to the commenter's site to leave a reply.  I don't like to use this because I feel like it's stepping out of the discussion realm to reply in a different discussion realm where the reply lacks context for most of the readers.  Most readers probably will not follow the interblog exchange and a part of the conversation is lost.

                             What's Your Opinion?

        Do you want a blog conversation?  Do you like a blog conversation?  Do you "subscribe" to a blog where you have left a comment so you will be emailed if you get a reply?   Do you read many of the other comments?   Do you reply to the comments that you receive on your blog?  Do you prefer receiving a one on one personal reply?     Do you reply individually or in a block of personally designated replies?  Is there an advantage to replying by e-mail or on the commenter's site?

                                      METRO TOUR

          This past Saturday I mentioned that I was going to be taking a tour given by the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority.  The tour was interesting and will be the inspiration of next week's blog topics on Tossing It Out.   I will look forward to hearing from some of you on the subject of public transportation.        
          

35 comments:

  1. Oh boy.. I am not following much of protocols when I leave comments, as many of them are just: "Interesting!", "Great Post", "A very touching story". I hope I am not being taken as shallow. My time is quite limited, and as I commented on other blog, family and work come first! I do take the time to read the complete post, and the comments. I hope blog owners appreciate that, plus my brief comment :-))

    This is a good discussion. I could add more, but unfortunately I need to get in the shower... :-))

    Have a great day!
    Doris

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  2. If the abvove reader thinks she's shallow then I am guilty of that also., I don't usual write long comments and mostly I don't get long comments, Joseph from Man On The Move always writes a long comment and has done so from the start of him following me, I find it hard to write (other than in poetic form) but I don't mean any less by what I write,

    Public transport, well here in the UK the fares are rising and the train service is worst so I'll shut up on that one.

    Most interesting post Lee and it is always a pleasure to read as a post or as a comment,

    Yvonne,.

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  3. Thanks for the mention! My post is still generating conversations. And that's the key word. I respond to many comments on my posts, usually in several large, group comments. Several people do come back to check my replies, too. I comment on a lot of blogs a day - somewhere around a hundred - so I don't always get to check back for replies, but I appreciate it when the host does respond. I don't email replies, though. I know some people get too many emails as it is - right, Lee?

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  4. I've always been a bad with the comments and if blogs were like facebook, I'd just click on the like button. But, I love getting comments and I usually reply back by email...atleast I try. Good topic. I've been thinking about doing one similar but that's just because I've been getting a ton of annonymous comments and spam.

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  5. I always try to respond to comments I receieve, whether it be through direct email or reply on the commentor's latest post. I really appreciate all of the comments that are left on my blog, whether they are positive or negative or just a little friendly hello from a follower, so I try as best I can to respond.
    Great post by the way- this really got the conversation going! Thanks for leaving such thoughtful comments on my posts last week... they were great, Lee!

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  6. This is such a good discussion topic, Lee. I struggle with it daily. If I want to do the other things in my life that are meaningful to me, like write, practice singing, dance, hang with hubs and friends, I have to limit my blogging time. That means visiting blogs once. I really don't want to be checking back several times to see if people responded to a comment I left on someone else's blog. I'd like to, but just don't have the time. So I'm just responding to comments on my blog as frequently as I can each day and hope for the best.
    Karen

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  7. More often than not the comments threads are better than my blogs. I appreciate that I have such awesome visitors that add something of value, rather than stopping by to say "Nice blog."

    And I don't subscribe to follow up comments. Tried that once and my Yahoo! inbox was flooded with scores of emails.

    Stephen Tremp

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  8. I would enjoy a blog conversation. I sometimes have subscribed to a blog so I can see if there was a response to my comment. I usually read other comments to see if my thoughts are in line with theirs. However, I find as we have already discussed many commenters are, I think, only making a token statement with the hope they will get a comment on their site.

    I try daily to respons to the comments that are made on my site. I started that practice becasue I saw you do it and do it very effectively. I liked the "touch" you gave to the comment section and I copied you.

    I don't know if there is an advantage of replying on the commenters email, I don't. I want to keep the discussion in the comment box in order to hopefully develop further comments.

    As you have said, my blog is a very speacialized blog that many people would not care for.

    I do find it difficult sometimes to comment however. I won't leave a shallow, token, untrue, or unrelated comment. A couple times when I responded to the topic but not as they blogger wanted and how everyone else was, I took a direct hit. So now I am very cautious about leaving some comments and on some blogs I still enjoy reading but I don't dare comment.

    With the chance that you might find this patronizing, I do enjoy your site and topics. It is always great to come here and read.

    I am amused that you havent ventured out yet and tried the new templates yet.

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  9. Thanks for the mention Lee :)

    I generally do my comments on the blog itself rather than via the email. I tend to do them individually because it's easier - I don't get lost when I'm scrolling up and down to see whose comment is next. I tried doing them in bunches, but I tended to skip people accidentally. Not a good thing :)

    'Impractical and idealistic? Of course!' -- love this line - in fact I'd love to have it on a t-shirt!! :)

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  10. Lee,

    Every blogger loves comments. It shows not only that someone is reading, but cares or is inspired enough to take the time to say SOMETHING. For me, even the short 3 word comments mean a lot.

    When I comment, I do try to leave something of substance. I don't follow a lot of blogs. In fact, yours is one of the VERY few I comment on. It is just the time thing. Working full time, running a small part time business(that in itself is very time consuming) and taking care of house when I come home leaves precious little time.

    As I am sure you will agree with, posting to your own blog takes a lot of time too. Coming up with a topic, and writing (and rewriting at times)

    There is just never enough time to do all I wish I could!!

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  11. Doris -- You probably are the majority. The time factor combined with our priorities preclude quality comments on every blog we follow. To at least visit many blogs and leave a short friendly greeting at least keeps one's blog relationships with many blogs active. It's usually a matter of one or the other.

    Yvonne -- You are in the camp I've just mentioned. You maintain many blog relationships and keep them active and I think we all appreciate that very much. As far as comments you receive you are in a different circumstance since you write poetry and usually don't pose issues or ask questions. Your readers are going to go into a scholarly analysis of your work since this is not the forum to do so. We read, enjoy, and let you know. Joseph's comments are unique and he tends to leave a lengthy literate comment when he leaves one. I would tend to believe he can't leave many of those eloquent quality comments on many blogs. I have always appreciated your stopping by to visit and at least letting me know you were there.

    Alex -- You have raised topics that I and others have often raised and they are topics that never really get old since there are always new bloggers and we who blog often wonder about these things. Now that I have organized my e-mails into an system, the notifications from comment replies and direct emails will be much easier to manage--at least until I go on a vacation or something.

    Jennee --- I've seen some blogs that do have a rating system. I have my little "reactions" rating at the bottom of my post but usually nobody uses it.

    Optimist -- I really enjoyed those posts you did about the signs-- they were smile eliciting. The way I see it is any comment is better than no comment. I'd even prefer a negative comment to no comment if that comment is honest and can help me learn something.

    Karen -- I'm mostly doing like you are. Priorities prevail and we all have lives. When I was doing the A to Z Challenge I found myself reading blogs, leaving comments, and responding to comments from early morn to late at night and I was doing little else. It builds following and increases comments, but it's not practical when there are other responsibilities to which to tend.

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  12. Stephen -- If you subscribe the e-mails often come fast and furious, but I find them easy to screen and delete. I'll agree that often the comments are some of the best parts of the post and often they have some really good information. Sometimes I think some of the comments I leave are better than my blog posts and I wonder if any one sees them.

    Gregg -- I really appreciate the kind words and agree with what you've said. Especially in a case like your blog where the topics can be issues that might be disagreed upon, ongoing debate could be a source of contention which might be an unbiblical thing to do. But you often present topics that lead to questions and concerns and you are very good at addressing those.
    One of the changes I've wanted to do is change my template, but I'm so paranoid that I'll accidentally erase all my archives or something. I do plan to do this eventually, but I've been doing so many other things lately.

    Jemi -- You are a very intimate responder which is one reason why I think you consistently have so many commenters. Your replies are like getting a thank you card in the mail.
    You have my permission to make the T-shirt.
    Thanks for your feedback since your method was an integral part of my post.

    Sig - You said it the way it is and like I already expressed. We can't change time, we can only build our lives around the time we have and use it to best advantage. Some activities have to be curtailed to do the others. Thanks for always being around for me and for the really quality comments you leave on my posts.

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  13. I prefer the blog conversation to take place ON the blog. While I appreciate comments via email, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc., they are not able to contribute to the comments gallery interaction or be responded to by the other readers.

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  14. I enjoy the debate as long as the participants are civil and open-minded. All too often, people online take a tone that they would not take in person.

    I'm the opposite-since someone who posts calling me a name obviously does not have the courage to say it to my face (if so,name the place and I'll meet you), I just hit the delete key. Life's too short to waste time on a narrow mind.

    But I welcome diverse opinions from my own, as I enjoy hearing what's behind differing opinions from my own.

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  15. I've gotten better at replying to comments on my own blog. If it's something pressing, I'll subscribe to a post's comment feed. Otherwise, please no more emails! Mine looks like yours did on some days.

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  16. Marvin --That's exactly the way I feel. It's like somebody might be left out of the conversation-- it's unlikely, but you never know.

    Larry -- Yes, we always have the option to censor what we don't like or feel is appropriate. It's rare, but I have done it. I find that most everyone comes across as very civil in a disagreement, sometimes cloyingly so. I don't think anyone has really gotten offensive with me.

    L.Diane --To me, if I made the comment then I am interested in a reply, or a reciprocal comment on my site, just to know that my comment was seen. The emails are easy to get rid of, but I just have to stay on top of them.

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  17. I must admit I find those e-mail responses to comments you leave on somebody's blog quite strange. As someone said before - if we wanted an e-mail communication we would send an email to blog owner not a comment under the post :)
    Not to mention that there were some bloggers who violated my e-mail address by sending me some weird chain letters ...

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  18. ...as for having conversations in the comment section, i would love it. but it's never happened in my blog. as a rule i always read the other comments because in some cases it's fascinating/interesting to read other viewpoints. sometimes i slip a bit and slow to respond to comments but generally reply in block form. sometimes the comments i leave behind are as long as my blog posts:) depends on the topic and how well i can relate to what's written. deep thoughts can really do a number on my shallow brain:) and i always go back to blogs and read their responses to my comments as well as others.

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  19. Part 1 Of 2:

    r-LEE-b ~
    I have been computerless all day and so I am just now able to weigh in on this topic.

    Like any blogger, I appreciate comments as they are an indication that someone is actually reading what I write. However, as in so many other things, I am in the great minority in how I view comments.

    I much prefer meaningful comments to the brief, pointless variety (which seem to dominate here at Blogspot.com). I don't mind someone occasionally leaving a superficial comment, but the person who does that routinely as their general modus operandi -- well, I would prefer NO COMMENT from them at all. And I am not so egotistical (egotistical, yes, but not SO egotistical) that I appreciate insincere compliments. Save that for someone more needy than I. Post "You rock!" on my blog and I will probably hunt you down and kill you with a Bowie knife! (OK, I kid - but barely.)

    I most emphatically DO NOT want someone "Following" my blogs solely because I follow theirs. I have "Followed" (and will continue to "Follow") the blogs of individuals who do not, in turn, "Follow" me. If I'm "Following" your blog, it's because I GENUINELY like what you write. I am NOT "Following" your blog out of a quid pro quo expectation. I am TOTALLY AUTHENTIC, and that's what I expect in return. I want to be able to feel confident that if a person is "Following" one of my blogs it is ONLY because they dig what I write. And likewise, I want everyone to understand that if I'm "Following" their blog, it's SOLELY for the same reason. I am "REAL" and I expect others to be "REAL" as well!

    In fact, I have a lot of respect for the person who doesn't "Follow" my blog(s) even though I'm "Following" theirs. I love their ability to cast aside B.S. ideas about expectations and phony "politeness" and to remain true to themselves. But so help me, if they never - not sometimes, but "NEVER" - reply to the comments I leave on their blogs, I WILL dump them! To me, that is the height of rudeness. If I comment on your blog (and more times than not, I will leave "A-List" comments), then you damn sure had better respond to my comments at least once in awhile. Otherwise - after a couple of months - I WILL "Un-Follow" them, and when I do, I WILL be thinking to myself: That is one RUDE dude or dudette.

    As a matter of common courtesy, I respond to ALL COMMENTERS at least once. Any blogger who feels they simply don't have the time to reply to those who go to the time and trouble of commenting on their blog installments should just STOP blogging. If you really don't have the time to acknowledge those who honor you with a comment, then you have no business blogging at all. If you're THAT self-centered, take a hike!

    I really don't care for the idea of receiving Emails in response to comments I leave on a person's blog. I only have one "Follower" who does that, and I like her, so I don't complain about it. But I don't at all understand that concept and I feel that comments are for "comment sections". If I were looking for an Email relationship, my blog post would be an Email message instead of a blog post.

    Continued Below...

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  20. Part 2 Of 2:

    Years ago, when I had a blog at Amazon.com, I had an Internet friend named Aaron, whom I nicknamed A-DogG. A-DogG and I had a very unique relationship in that we seemed simpatico in many (although not all) ways. He regularly commented on my blog postings and we would get into these amazin' discussions that went on and on and on and on! A-DogG had a very witty mind and a great ability for wordplay, and my blog posts became mere jumping off points for A-DogG and I to start "riffing", and not only did we have each other laughing but outside visitors laughing as well.

    With A-DogG and myself, there was an abundance of long-running inside jokes (that anyone following over a period of time would come to understand). One of the many of them pertained to Robert Blake and his TV character "Baretta". Somehow or another (and always in some seemingly natural way) Blake or "Baretta" would find his way into our ongoing dialogues, and damn, it was FUNNY!

    More than one person told me that although they really enjoyed my blog postings, what they liked best was watching where A-DogG and I would go with them from there. I had readers following the blog just for the amusement of seeing what A-DogG and I could turn them into. The wordplay was a gas, and the riffing was... well, you just had to be there. It was like watching Jimi Hendrix and Eddie Van Halen on Words. DAMN! DO I EVER MISS THOSE DAYS!

    I would love to have a relationship like that with a "Follower" here at Blogspot.com, but sadly, nothing even close to it has ever developed. I find myself involved in very few meaningful (and ongoing) discussions in the comment sections of my blogs. In fact, I feel that my blogs have been a major bust, and that is just one of the reasons that my output is soon to diminish noticeably.

    I hated (and still hate) Amazon.com, but I gotta admit, there was a whole lot more life there than there is here at Blogspot.com. I feel like a real outsider here in Blogland. I don't "get" the mind-set of most bloggers here at all. But then again, I've always been the "Screwball".

    Anyway, good topic, Bro! I only wish I had something more substantive to contribute to it.

    ~ StephenBoy McMe

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  21. Dezmond -- I'm with you on the email comments. It's meant to be thoughtful I guess, but I'd still rather have them on the comment section.
    And I know how you feel about the chain letter things. I usually ignore them and fortunately I don't get many from bloggers. If I did I would remove my email from my profile.

    Bud--I also sometimes leave comments as long as a post, but hey that's putting our thoughts out there and communicating. That's what I'm talking about and most of the time it just doesn't happen. I do appreciate your comments whether they be long or short.

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  22. StMc -- Hey what's the deal leaving some short-assed little comment on here. And breaking it into two parts to make it look long. Pitiful!

    Seriously though, you do leave substantial comments and I pretty know how you stand on this whole issue. And I agree with you in most respects. But I also can see from the point of view of some of the folks that visit a deeper blog like your own. Sometimes they might just not have anything to say because maybe you've gone over their head or something. Or maybe it's something else. Just knowing that someone read or tried to read something and was thoughtful enough to say they were there is okay with me.

    It's like if you were with a group of people and politely everything introduced themselves and greeted one another. Then a discussion ensued and one or some of the people didn't join in but just politely listened and maybe nodded in agreement. Then later politely said goodnight and left.

    Okay maybe not the most brilliant company, but maybe they were shy, felt stupid, or just didn't have anything they wanted to add to the conversation.

    I look at the issue like a face to face encounter. I like to acknowledge presence if someone leaves a comment and respond in kind to how their comment was presented. No big deal.

    Amazon was a forum that existed mainly for discussion. I don't totally know what the blogs exist for, I just know which ones I enjoy and do whatever I feel inspired to do. If I have something to say about someone else's blog I try to leave a comment that invites dialogue when appropriate. Usually no dialog occurs and that's just the way it is.

    I'm still experimenting to see what can happen. I have gone on some sites provokingly with polite negativity and usually garner a response. But we're mostly in the wrong community to have discussions of any substance. It's a place to express ourselves and hope somebody has enough time to comment with quality.

    But it's okay for now as far as I'm concerned. I'd say keep pushing for dialogue and somewhere along the line it might happen.

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  23. I personally prefer a response within the blog. I don't "subscribe" but I try to return to the blog to see if there is a response. (not everyone does it so I'm really glad you posted this up.)

    I don't know what other people do for my blog. For my faith blog I've slowed down on the individualised comments unless I have something in particular to say about their comment. I will always go to the commenter's blog and leave a comment about their post.

    But on my writing blog I try to respond to every comment within the comments section. I was worried no one came back to read those responses, but I wrote them anyway in the hope that they did. I also go to the commentor's blog and leave a comment related to their own post -- to share the love.

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  24. LEE ~

    >> Hey what's the deal leaving some short-assed little comment on here. And breaking it into two parts to make it look long. Pitiful!

    Ha!-Ha!
    Aww, yer on to me.
    Well, I got away with it for quite awhile.

    Just knowing that someone read or tried to read something and was thoughtful enough to say they were there is okay with me.

    Yeah, I know that my viewpoint on this question is uncommon and that most people prefer to get some comment - even a very superficial one - than no comment at all. And there’s certainly room in this world for viewpoints other than my own.

    >> I look at the issue like a face to face encounter. I like to acknowledge presence if someone leaves a comment and respond in kind to how their comment was presented.

    Yes, and that’s also the way I view the comment thang in general. To me, it really IS like a face-to-face discussion. And if I say something to someone, or ask them a question (in their comment section) and they do not answer or acknowledge that I’ve said something to them, it’s the same sort of rudeness as if we were in each other’s presence, face-to-face, and I said something to them or asked them a question, and instead of replying, they simply turned and walked away. How rude would THAT be?!

    That’s why I say that if someone really doesn’t have the time to at least briefly acknowledge those who speak to them or ask them a question in their comment sections, then really, that person doesn’t have the time to maintain a proper, respectable, and polite blog, and they should just find something less time-consuming than blogging on which to spend their limited free time.

    I do see this as a personal exchange, and I also see that too many bloggers are downright RUDE! I don’t necessarily expect a blogger to respond to EVERY comment I leave, but they had damn sure better respond to SOME of them. And they damn sure had better give me an answer if I ask them a question, or I will “Un-Follow” their blog pretty darn quick.

    Amazon was a forum that existed mainly for discussion. I don't totally know what the blogs exist for, I just know which ones I enjoy and do whatever I feel inspired to do.

    Well, that’s not quite right. Originally, Amazon existed solely as a forum for people to post product reviews. It wasn’t until years later that they made the mistake of adding comment sections to reviews (and gave the reviewers NO CONTROL WHATSOEVER over which comments could be posted onto the bottom of their reviews). And that’s when Amazon turned into a forum for discussion – or more accurately, “an ugly forum for arguing and for every drive-by A-hole to “spray paint their nastiness all over every review they disagree with”. Amazon went to hell, and it was all because of the morons who run that site. Amazon’s customer service is good for those who make purchases, but otherwise, it is easily the worst managed website I’ve ever encountered in my Internet life.

    Yak Later, Brother.
    ~ D-FensDogg

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  25. Hey, what happened to the comment I left here this morning? It was posted and now it's gone.

    LEE, has it come to this?
    You would "delete" me?
    Et tu, Arlee?

    ~ D-FensDogg

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  26. Comment from Stephen T McCarthy that mysteriously vanished. Recreated from my memory:



    LEE ~

    >> Hey what's the deal leaving some short-assed little comment on here. And breaking it into two parts to make it look long. Pitiful!

    Ha!-Ha!
    Aww, yer on to me.
    Well, I got away with it for quite awhile.

    Just knowing that someone read or tried to read something and was thoughtful enough to say they were there is okay with me.

    Yeah, I know that my viewpoint on this question is uncommon and that most people prefer to get some comment - even a very superficial one - than no comment at all. And there’s certainly room in this world for viewpoints other than my own.

    >> I look at the issue like a face to face encounter. I like to acknowledge presence if someone leaves a comment and respond in kind to how their comment was presented.

    Yes, and that’s also the way I view the comment thang in general. To me, it really IS like a face-to-face discussion. And if I say something to someone, or ask them a question (in their comment section) and they do not answer or acknowledge that I’ve said something to them, it’s the same sort of rudeness as if we were in each other’s presence, face-to-face, and I said something to them or asked them a question, and instead of replying, they simply turned and walked away. How rude would THAT be?!

    That’s why I say that if someone really doesn’t have the time to at least briefly acknowledge those who speak to them or ask them a question in their comment sections, then really, that person doesn’t have the time to maintain a proper, respectable, and polite blog, and they should just find something less time-consuming than blogging on which to spend their limited free time.

    I do see this as a personal exchange, and I also see that too many bloggers are downright RUDE! I don’t necessarily expect a blogger to respond to EVERY comment I leave, but they had damn sure better respond to SOME of them. And they damn sure had better give me an answer if I ask them a question, or I will “Un-Follow” their blog pretty darn quick.

    Amazon was a forum that existed mainly for discussion. I don't totally know what the blogs exist for, I just know which ones I enjoy and do whatever I feel inspired to do.

    Well, that’s not quite right. Originally, Amazon existed solely as a forum for people to post product reviews. It wasn’t until years later that they made the mistake of adding comment sections to reviews (and gave the reviewers NO CONTROL WHATSOEVER over which comments could be posted onto the bottom of their reviews). And that’s when Amazon turned into a forum for discussion – or more accurately, “an ugly forum for arguing and for every drive-by A-hole to “spray paint their nastiness all over every review they disagree with”. Amazon went to hell, and it was all because of the morons who run that site. Amazon’s customer service is good for those who make purchases, but otherwise, it is easily the worst managed website I’ve ever encountered in my Internet life.

    Yak Later, Brother.
    ~ D-FensDogg

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  27. StMc -- Above is the comment copied from my email receipt of it. Strange that it disappeared. Maybe Google didn't like what you said about Amazon.

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  28. Lynda -- If you didn't subscribe to the comments for this post you probably won't see my reply, but thank you for leaving your comment.

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  29. Hi Lee .. yes I do like a blog conversation .. and I do subscribe to the comments – otherwise I’d miss a salient reply .. and I’d hate not to reply to perhaps an expected reply back. So far I reply individually to commenters, but I may resort to doing one comment with lots of @s in as a start to save myself time ... when I am lucky enough to have sufficient commenters! Occasionally I’ll email – but only if it’s about a personal aspect, rather than a public one ..

    Your tour of the Metro sounds fun . and I look forward to reading .. have a good day .. Hilary

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  30. Hilary -- Sounds like you and I are in sync with the way we operate as far as commenting. I've noticed that you regularly reply to comments you receive. I see them because I subscribe to your comments after I have commented. A lot of people miss those replies as well as the comments from other readers because they don't subscribe.

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  31. Arlee--You have a great discussion going on here...Sorry I didn't show up on time. My daughter starts back to school today and we've been doing all the last minute fun things we possibly could do...

    This is what I've decided to do...reply to those who have their email enabled reponses available and comment on my blog and of course hop over to their blogs and comment on their post.

    I really enjoy the new email friendships I've formed since I changed my blogger setting that allows for the automatic replies.

    I don't subscribe to comments, but often look back over them on the next post if the topic peaked my interest.

    If I stop by a blog I leave a comment of some sort. Even if it's just a "nice post" comment...I'd want to know if someone stopped by, even if they didn't have much to say. :)

    Have a good one!

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  32. Sharon -- I agree with you on the at least say something if you visit point of view. It's just nice for a blog owner to know and by getting one's own name out there one can increase the chance of having new visitors on one's own blog.

    The e-mail technique is person and increases chances of relationship building, but I still think it excludes other commenters from the conversation. Similarly, by not subscribing one walks away from an ongoing conversation and is more apt to forget to go back to see what has been said.

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  33. >> Maybe Google didn't like what you said about Amazon.

    I assume that was just an off-the-cuff joke.
    Or is there some Google/Amazon connection or relationship that I am unaware of?

    ~ D-FensDogg

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  34. StMc -- Joke? I don't know, I was just kind of tossing that out there. But heck, now you never now. I think all these things are interconnected in someway. It's related to the one world government probably. But I guess I should be quiet before my entire blog disappears.

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  35. Whew! You scared me for a minute there.
    I thought maybe you were implying that Google (Blogspot) was a subsidiary of Amazon, or vice versa, and that I was gonna have to stop blogging sooner than later.

    ~ D-FensDogg
    'Loyal American Underground'

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Go ahead and say something. Don't be afraid to speak your mind.
I normally try to respond to all comments in the comment section so please remember to check the "Email follow-up comments" box if you want to participate in the comment conversation.

For Battle of the Bands voting the "Anonymous" commenting option has been made available though this version is the least preferred. If voting using "anonymous" please include in your comment your name (first only is okay) and city you are voting from and the reason you chose the artist you did.

If you know me and want to comment but don't want to do it here, then you can send me an email @ jacksonlee51 at aol dot com.

Lee