The Manhattan Project--2016 A to Z Theme

Always a work in progress--welcome to my blog...

Friday, May 29, 2015

Is Music Your Friend?

Eye in the Sky (album)
Eye in the Sky (album) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


Well the music is your special friend
Dance on fire as it intends
Music is your only friend
Until the end

--The Doors

        In late June of 1982 I was sitting in the parking lot of a supermarket in Billings, Montana listening to the radio when I heard the Alan Parsons Project song "Eye in the Sky".   Even before the song had ended I decided that this was a perfect pop hit and one of my favorite songs.  To this day I stand by this.   This is a song that I never tire of hearing.

       Sometime in 1985 the song "Cherish" by Kool and the Gang was released.   I had heard songs by Kool and the Gang for over a decade and never cared for the group that much though I didn't find their songs totally obnoxious--it just wasn't my kind of music.  "Cherish" received extensive airplay after its release.  I heard it often, but for the most part ignored it as it just wasn't my kind of music.

       Then one afternoon sometime in January of 1988 I was sitting in the parking lot of Buddy's Market in Maryville, Tennessee listening to the radio when the song "Cherish" came on.  As I listened closely I realized what a beautiful song it was.  The lyrics touched me deeply at that moment.  Not only did this song become another one of my favorites, but I started buying Kool and the Gang albums as I began enjoying their other music.  Now "Cherish" is another one of my favorite songs--I still well up with emotion whenever I listen to this exquisite song.

      After I'd bought the album that contained the song "Cherish" I was playing it one day as my show crew was setting up our equipment for our performance later that night.  As the song "Cherish" was playing I happened to mention to one of the young female cast members with whom I used to discuss music a lot how I thought the song was so beautiful.   My comment was met with laughter as she responded, "Really!  That's the cheesiest song ever. I can't stand it!"

      Well, go figure.  Granted her favorite music was Morrissey and The Smiths--music that I likewise enjoyed--but I was baffled by her reaction to the song "Cherish".  I wondered how someone could not like that song.  But then I remembered that I was in no way impressed with the song either for a few years of having heard it.  What was different about my experience and why should she have liked the song?

        In some respects I think the way we appreciate music is similar to the way we make friends.  Maybe your experiences are similar to mine.  There have been people whom I have met and we immediately clicked.  I liked them as soon as I saw them and remained friends with them throughout the years.  Then there are certain people whom I had to learn to appreciate.

       One of my best friends is an example. When I first met him I didn't care for him much at all and soon I came to somewhat dislike him.  As time passed, I discovered this man to be an amazingly talented fellow as well as a very intelligent conversationalist.  Over a period of several years I began to realize how this guy was someone I could always count on to do what he said he was going to do and was an extremely reliable individual.  Now he is one of my favorite people and one of the few of my friends in Tennessee whom I call on a regular basis.   It took some time, but I grew to like him.

        Maybe not everyone is like this, but I think we are all more alike than not.   For me at least, music is like the people I encounter.  I tend to be polite and civil toward just about everyone with whom I come into contact.  I'll give them a chance and maybe we become friends or maybe we don't. That's the way I approach music.   Maybe the music is immediately recognized as being compatible with my tastes or maybe I have to discover the nuances that allow me to appreciate the music in the same way my good friend took time for me to appreciate him.

         If there is music that I liked in the past, I will continue to find something to like now when I hear it.   I may not enjoy listening to that music as much now as I used to, but I can't say I hate it because that music holds memories and evokes feelings.   In fact, just as I prefer to say I don't hate any person, I don't like to say I hate any music as long as I can recognize some amount of talent that had to be present in order to create that music.

         The way I see it, music is people.  Not in the way Soylent Green is people, but in the sense that music is an extension of the person or the people who created it.  Writers should understand that as should anyone who creates.   That which we mindfully produce as an extension of our creative spirit is part of us.  The song composer might be someone who could possibly be a friend to us and so could the song the composer composes.    Music has value, but it may not have the same value to all of us.

          Your favorite song may not be my favorite because I have apparently not been in the zone you were when you decided that song was your favorite.  Timing, place, circumstance, experience all contribute to influencing our preference.   What we felt or who we were with when we heard a song can have a bearing on our liking it and it's possible that song might be in a genre we normally haven't liked before.  Who can explain it?   I'm sure there are explanations for each case, but they would be as many as the songs we have heard in our lifetime.

          So what's the point of all this?  Partly it's my contemplation on the nature of our preferences, our likes and dislikes, something to do with why we are like we are.  I'm just skimming the surface of it all, but maybe it's something for you to reflect upon as well and add your thoughts in the comments.

           And the heart of the matter in context of my posts of this week leading in to my Battle of the Bands post coming up on Monday is that we should all be open to the music that each of us presents on our sites.   In the Battles ahead as in my past Battles, I will continue to post music that I like or that interests me in some way.   Not everyone might like what I post, but I hope you'll try to as least appreciate the music.  Just because you've never heard a song or an artist before doesn't mean you can't come up with an opinion.  All the better to have an open mind I think.  Remember that the songs that are your favorites now were once songs you'd never heard before.  Listen, learn, and vote on a favorite just like you might do if you were judging a talent contest.

          Treat music as you would someone you might meet for the first time or have known for a long time.   Music should be your friend.   Or at least like someone whom you can tolerate respectfully while in their company.  You don't have to hang around with people you don't get along with nor do you have to continually listen to music you don't like.   Not under normal circumstances at least.

       I just want to see everyone have fun with the Battle of the Bands posts.  I know I enjoy them.


When the music's over
Turn out the lights

--The Doors


          Do you have a good friend whom you didn't like at first meeting?   Would you say the personification of music as an extension of those who create it is a reasonable description?    What are some of the criteria that you think determines preference?  

50 comments:

  1. My wife's and my first meeting won't go down in the history books as one of the most romantic meetings ever. ;)
    She was playing cards in the student lounge at our dorm and she asked me if I knew how to play Euchre. I said no and she replied with a "well I guess you are shit out of luck."

    Thankfully we got past that!

    Now back to APP's Eye in the Sky. Yeah I loved that song on first listen. Reminds me of this adventure we played back in the day for Dungeons & Dragons. In fact I can't even read that without the song going through my head.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tim, it's funny sometimes how we make connections with songs. Your wife sounds like a lady with a sardonic sense of humor. Actually she had a kind of funny line on that first encounter. Glad things worked out for you two.

      Lee

      Delete
  2. My best friend in the world and I did not like each other one bit at first. I don't even remember how we ended up starting to hang out together other than the fact that we were both majoring in Mass Communications and we both worked at our college radio station. But we went from intense dislike to inseparable and to this day she is one of my dearest, bestest friends in the whole world.

    I love Eye in the Sky; that's a great album, but my fave song from it is Psychobabble.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. JoJo, it's funny how friendships can work. Sometimes it even goes in the opposite direction where you spend a lot of time with someone and then just drift apart. But I don't think we ever lose the emotion attached to the memories. It's kind of like divorce. I remember a lot of good times spent with my ex-wife and they were some happy days, but I have no desire to rekindle the relationship.

      Lee

      Delete
  3. I have a friend that didn't like me much the first couple years we knew each other, and not he's a good friend and a true brother in Christ.
    Since progressive rock is my first genre of choice, I am used to it taking a while to warm up to the music. Prog rock is complex and it takes several listens to really grasp a song.
    And I will be participating Monday in Battle of the Bands!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alex, I think a great many people give up right away on music like prog rock, classical, and jazz because it doesn't fit easily into their brain. There are so many levels to discover! And in some cases it's just a sort of stubborn sense of prejudice and preconceived opinions. I'm a firm believer that first impressions can help guide us, but they are not the definitive decider to determine the lasting quality of something.

      Got you down for BOTB!

      Lee

      Delete
  4. This post is pretty philosophical and a lot of food for thought about art, people and life. It makes me think of the Eastern thought of bowing to the "God" or "specialness" of everyone.
    I had to go back to listen to both songs. I could not remember them even though I recognized them. This post is too good for a quick snappy comment. Take care.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ann, there is a specialness to everyone, but there is also that mutual connectiveness that is necessary to bring the special qualities to their best light. If we turn our backs or act disdainfully towards other people (and music as well) then it's a pretty sure thing that there won't be much to like or appreciate. God speaks through everything but we sadly often shut out most of what He is saying.

      Lee

      Delete
  5. This is all so true! I totally agree with you about why some people have preferences that I may not. They may have "... not been in the zone you were when you decided that song was your favorite. Timing, place, circumstance, experience all contribute to influencing our preference."
    I also think that the songs we love bring us back to a specific time and memories. Therefore, if someone does not have the same happy associations, then they may not like the same song.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lauren, in the case of the young woman I mention here she was younger than I and kind of a goth type so I think her cynicism tied in with some issues in her past made her embrace the music that reflected her experience whereas I was married with a family and had sentimental feelings about a lot of things and songs that expressed that are ones that I related to. Still though, sometimes I'm so amazed by a piece of music that I get perplexed when someone doesn't hear what I hear in it.

      Lee

      Delete
    2. Yeah, sometimes I think "how can someone not like this song?" However, everyone is different.
      Once I was completely astonished when someone told me they did not like chocolate. I COULD NOT believe it!!
      ha, ha... to each their own.

      Delete
    3. Lauren, this brings another interesting point to the discussion. Sometimes it's a matter of mood. I like chocolate a lot, but there are times when it just doesn't sound good to me at all. There is music like that as well. Sometimes I'll really want to rock out or maybe even hear some really "angry" music to get me going while other times I want quiet and mellow.

      When I was going through my second divorce I didn't want to hear music at all. That wife and I had been so into music and there were so many musical memories connected to our relationship that I guess I didn't want to be reminded. In fact at times I almost hated music then and preferred silence. Thankfully I got over that!

      Lee

      Delete
  6. I do remember disliking a girl in school and I had no clue why I didn't like her. There was to reason, but evenly whatever stood in my way went away and we became friends. Actually we were good friends in school, not best friends, but really good friends. I feel the same way about music. There are some tunes I hear for the first time and they don't stick, then somewhere down the road it sorta clicks with me. I enjoyed your comparison of music and people. I will see on Monday for BoTB! Have a good weekend, my friend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cathy, I think the comparison between music and people is a very sound one (oops! almost punny) and it can be applied to anything for that matter such as movies, food, hobbies, and so on.

      Lee

      Delete
  7. Whoever coined the phrase "Music is what feelings sound like" had it right on the money because feelings are what motivate the artist and in turn resonate (or not) with the listener.
    I've always liked "Eye in the sky" but my dawg! I'd forgotten all about "Cherish" - beautiful song - and now I feel all weepy! :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Diedre, I agree with that saying about music. I too get kind of weepy or moved whenever I hear "Cherish" I think part of what eventually grabbed me about that song was when I heard in on that January day I was listening to the lyrics and really got what the song was saying. Often I tend to ignore lyrics and just go for the effect that the sound of the music has on me.

      Lee

      Delete
  8. I can think of a few songs, albums, or artists that I didn't initially like, but have grown on me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. MRR, I can think of several. I can also think of certain songs, albums, or artists that I used to listen to all the time and haven't had the urge to listen to them in a long time. It's not a matter of dislike though, it's mostly that I don't listen to music to the extent that I used to.

      Lee


      Delete
  9. Hi, Lee! You and I have at least one thing in common. We both have the ability to recall precisely when and where we first heard our favorite songs. In the case of "Cherish," it seems like there was an incubation period that was required before you arrived at a time and place that allowed you to be receptive to the song.

    I agree with you that some types of music and people are an acquired taste. We need to remember that we are always changing and our tastes change along with us. I have discovered that there are quite a few recordings (and people) that I like or love for no apparent reason. There are just as many that I want to like and feel that I should like based on my history and preferences, but that I simply don't like. You listed some of the variables responsible for influencing our preferences. I am sure there are many other subliminal persuaders governing the choices we make.

    Thank you for providing more food for thought, good buddy Lee. Have a great weekend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, Shady, I'm sure I've only scratched the surface of the variables that influence preference and this probably works in varying way for various people. The complexity is so great that it would probably be difficult to ever come up with all the precise reasons. And as you indicate, we tend to change as time goes by. Thank goodness for that change too! I'd hate to see anyone be stuck with an inability to be flexible in their life.

      Lee

      Delete
  10. I don't know. There is some music I have to just turn off when it comes on. Some of it I even liked when I first heard it but, once I figured out the lyrics, I quit liking it. What a song says is very important to me.
    There are people who are that way, too. Unfortunately, you can't turn people off.

    And, yes, some music has to be in the correct context before you can like it. When the band Audio Adrenaline first started out, I didn't like them at all. Later, though, I heard one of their songs in a different context and thought, "Well, this song, at least, is okay." Later still, a new album came out, which I gave a chance only because of the previous song, and they became one of my favorite bands for a while (until they split up).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd agree with what you've said, Andrew. There have been songs like John Lennon's "Imagine" that I now have a different opinion about. I still essentially like the song, but it raises some negative connotations for me. I'm sure that I can come up with better examples if I try hard enough, but now none come to mind.

      There have been artists that I've really enjoyed and then they come out with a dog of an album that makes me see them in a less positive way. I can go back and forth on music at times, but then there are the pieces that have stayed consistent for me for decades. I certainly can't explain it exactly, but I think I could come up with some good ideas.

      Lee

      Delete
  11. The first time I took my son to a local all-ages show, he said, "I don't know if I'm going to like this. I don't know any of these songs." I said, "Well, all the songs you like you didn't know once." He became a veteran follower of what he heard, trying to fight his way into a mosh at age 8!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, Chris, when someone uses that line that they don't know the music it really doesn't hold much weight with me. It's not like they're being asked to sing the song, but just listen and see what they think. How difficult is that? I'm always thrilled to be offered music I've never heard before.

      Lee

      Delete
  12. Hey Lee, I love that you opened and closed with the Doors, When the Music's Over has been one of my favourite songs for years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Eva, the lyrics immediately popped into my head as I was formulating this post. It is a good song from perhaps my favorite Doors album.

      Lee

      Delete
  13. I'm trying to think if I've ever become really close with someone I didn't initially like at all. I can't think of anyone. I suppose I have come to think someone was more okay than I thought there were in the beginning. Meaning improvement, but I cannot think of a really close friend who I disliked at the onset.

    As for music, I think I can safely say that BoTB has made me aware of many songs that were previously off my radar. Some I've really liked, some I thought were okay, and some I didn't care for at all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Robin, I've felt the same way about songs that people have used. It has been interesting to see what songs that people have chosen and what they've had to say about them. BOTB has been a real learning experience for me musically speaking.

      Lee

      Delete
  14. I have different favorite, go to songs for different moods and feelings. I know a few years ago, I discovered all of the awesome rock music created in the 80's that I had missed because all I listened to in the 80's was country. And then today at work, my co-worker was playing a country station that plays only new country. I listened to it for four hours and then I told her, "I cannot tell when one song end and another begins. Every song songs the same, every song is about the same things, and every singers voice is almost identical to the previous voice." Formula music is what I call it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Barbara, I kind of see that too. I guess any genre starts sounding basically the same across the board until you start really listening closely to it.

      Lee

      Delete
  15. I love this analogy between music and people, Lee. Great post. Have I got a story for you! ☺...I met my husband in the spring of 1971 about 6 months after he emigrated from Italy. His English was limited, but apart from that, we disliked each other on first sight. This was a bit awkward, since we had friends in common and saw each other frequently. Eventually, dislike turned into platonic friendship. Then, in Oct. of that year, he asked me to accompany him to a dinner/dance. That surprised me, but I still thought of it as merely "two friends going out". Over the course of the evening, and many "slow" dances, I fell in love with him. We've been together ever since and will be celebrating our 42nd anniversary in August. He was definitely an "acquired taste", similar to some pieces of music, as you mentioned. That said, there were songs I disliked in my younger years that I still don't care for and some songs that I did like that seem silly and insipid now. The older I get, the harder I rock! LOL Battle of the Bands is my new favourite activity. ♥ Thanks for turning me on to it! See you Monday.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Debbie, that's a great story that so well illustrates what I've said in my post. We rarely know everything there is to know about a person, a piece of music, or anything else on first encounter. Many external factors as well as our moods and mind states can also play a role in acquiring a taste for something.

      There were many years when I would say how much I disliked country music until I realized that a great many of the songs I liked were actually country or influenced by the genre. When we judge according to preconceived opinions then we might be missing out on something that we actually might enjoy a great deal and we're certainly not doing ourselves any great favors by shutting things or people out of our lives that are well worth knowing more about.

      Congratulations on your marriage. That kind of enduring relationship has become somewhat rare in our generation.

      Lee

      Delete
    2. Thanks! Yes, 42 years of marriage are definite "bragging rights" these days. ☺ I try to keep an open mind about musical genres. I still don't like Hip Hop (aka Rap), but some of those performers are fun to watch, even though my ears don't really enjoy the sound. Some also have clever lyrics, which I can appreciate. I did like 1970s country music (Freddy Fender, Dolly Parton, Charlie Rich, Kenny Rogers) and a lot of it now has more of a country/rock vibe which is enjoyable too.

      Delete
  16. This is such a great post! Music almost always takes me to a distant memory, or sometimes, it's even the background of a memory in the making. I really excited to be participating in the battle of the bands. So much that I've already written the posts for my first three battles.

    When I was younger, I used to say I disliked country music, but in reality, it was the fabric that made up the music that I was currently listening to. I also used to say that I disliked Rap. I have been able to find a few gems that are fun to listen to. Death Metal - I still struggle with, but sometimes I am able to take the song apart and appreciate the lyrics for what they are trying to say, and there are days that I 'get it'. I've never understood people that say they only listen to X type music. How do they properly express themselves? As a female, I have many emotions, and each genre of music has a way of expressing those emotions. I could never pigeon hole myself into only one genre.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mary, you and I have similar views regarding music. I just left on response to a comment left on my Wrote By Rote blog that said something very similar to what you've said here about country music.

      To me, if I can recognize some specific talent or ability that it took to create a musical piece then I'll acknowledge that part at least. I still might not enjoy listening to it, but I'll concede the effort that it took to make it and try to find something to like about it.

      I don't think I'll ever confine myself to only one kind of music. As wise Solomon said in Ecclesiastes, there is a time for everything.

      Lee

      Delete
  17. I remember listening to music with my little sister. We'd discuss the songs, the artists, lip sync and make up our own dances. Now all she listens to is talk radio. I'm eclectic in my listening pleasure, don't really know why sometimes I like a song, or group. I was surprised I enjoy listening to Insane Clown Posse (ICP) despite the murderous content of the lyrics. Perhaps it is my negative nature that draws me to them. I'm the same with people; I like some right away, but people have to grow on me over time. But if I dislike a person immediately, I rarely like them later. I think I'm that way about songs too. If I dislike it right off, I won't listen long enough to like it. For instance: I love the group Sugarland, but hate their song All I Wanna Do. Will click it off the instant I hear the first strands. And it played on country music constantly for a while, so much that I stopped listening to Country for several months to avoid the song. Silly, huh?

    ReplyDelete
  18. Dolorah, now I'll have to go to listen to "All I Wanna Do". I tend to listen to a lot more talk radio these days over music. Much of the day though I just have silence as I do stuff on my computer.

    Lee

    ReplyDelete
  19. I am amazed at how many songs are tied to a particular place for me... As for Solvent Green, I hadn't thought about that movie in decades!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sage, I saw Soylent Green on TCM not too long ago and it still holds up pretty well--great film!

      Lee

      Delete
  20. I really like this idea of approaching music as we would someone we're meeting for the first time--with respect, curiosity and an open mind. How much more likely are we to give different genres of music a chance if we don't turn our backs because the first few bars make us want to stuff our fingers into our ears?

    And, of course, the reverse is true too--we're far less likely to be be judgemental if we approach strangers with that same openness.

    So glad I stopped by today and read your post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kern, I'm glad you stopped by as well. I like the way you summarized this into your own words. Excellent!

      Lee

      Delete
  21. Q - Do you have a good friend whom you didn't like at first meeting?

    A -I met my best friend when we got off of the school bus to fight. She had insulted a quiet little guy on the bus. I told her to pick on someone her size. She said I would do... so we got off of the school bus and prepared to fight. We ended up laughing at each other.


    Q - Would you say the personification of music as an extension of those who create it is a reasonable description?
    A - Yes, and I might not have agreed so readily before I joined battle of the Bands. Researching an artist's life gives me insight into why he/she has created the song, lyrics, or overall composition. It can be uncanny.

    Q - What are some of the criteria that you think determines preference?
    A - 1- Location of where one has been raised or has lived. 2 - Culture. 3 - People you hang out with. 4 - Age. 5 - Exposure to a certain genre.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dixie, I had a similar "fight" circumstance when I was in junior high. One of the fellows became my best friend and after 50 years we remain friends though we live across the country from each other.

      I agree about the BOTB research. I've found so much cool stuff while researching my posts.

      I also agree with you about those points of what determines preference. There are also more, but those are vital ones.

      Lee

      Delete
  22. There are some bands I've loved from the jump, though my love and appreciation of them has evolved, matured, and grown over the years, no longer at the simplistic level it was originally. Other bands I've grown in love with, like my favorite band, The Who. I've been interested in them since I was 13, liked them since I was 14, but have only loved them since I was 20. It was a long, slow journey from casual lawn seat fan to serious, hardcore fan, but it's created an enduring love all these years.

    Sometimes I'm still surprised I've been a Duranie for about four and a half years now. The spark had been planted a long time ago, but things didn't click and make me start becoming a passionate, real fan until late 2010/early 2011. Of all the bands on my favorites list, I know one of these things is not like the others!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Carrie-Anne, I had similar experience in music. And I sometimes will go back and forth or go through phases. But anything that I once liked, I can always go back to see what it was that I liked about them. The bigger mysteries are the ones that I didn't care for all that much at one time and they grew to be a favorite.

      Lee

      Delete
  23. Somewhere along the way I lost my interest in music. My husband has thousands of songs on his playlist, I have zero.
    Interesting, though, yesterday, my cousin posted a song on FB by Tom Waits called “Jersey Girl”. I gave a listen and found myself getting emotional. I can’t explain why. By the way, I have no idea who Tom Waits is. This morning, he, my cousin, posted another song by Waits called “Small Change” and I found myself tapping my foot and giggling. The lyrics are so clever and very funny.
    My cousin is a remarkable guy who is dealing with heartbreakingly tough life circumstances. Perhaps that’s why his song recommendations have an effect on me. Anyway, my curiosity has been piqued. I might have to visit iTunes and download a tune or two.

    I have been on the A-Z road trip. Admittedly, taking my time. But, I have found myself questioning why I am drawn to certain blogs and not others. I realized that I have a mental check list, a biased one for sure. I’m trying to work on that. Rule #1: Don’t check the “About Me” page before reading a post or two!”
    Here is my gauge as far as developing personal relationships. If after being in a person’s company for several hours and the other person does not ask me a single question, chances are they never will and I take that as an indication that they are just not that in to me :)
    I feel a sustainable relationship has to be somewhat of a mutual admiration society.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lynda, Tom Waits would strike me as an interesting artist choice to pull you back into music. He does some good music, but it is very different and for some off-putting. I can take him when I'm in the right mood. Like you say it might have something to do with the one who recommended it.

      This reminds me of my sister and I. When I recommend something to her she usually doesn't care for it and vice versa. There are others that I found like this.

      The question of blog preference is a good one. Some blogs that are very popular I'll go to and not understand the big fuss.

      Your observation about the one-sided relationship is excellent. I'll agree to a certain extent. A relationship that is ongoing requires some balance in conversation. My best friends are like that. I have one long time friend who will ramble on about his interests and I can barely get a word in that will bring things to my interests. What I might say he will usually grab onto and turn it back to his monologue. In the past decade or so though he gets onto politics that are totally against what I believe and he goes into a tirade and rants on and on no matter how much I try to turn the conversation. Where I used to call him at least once a month, now it's more like once a year and even that has started to seem like too much.

      Your observation about the "mutual admiration society" is very true. There has to be balance or I might as watch someone lecture me on TV or something like that.

      Lee

      Delete
    2. I love Tom Waits and have all (I think) his albums but his early stuff is very different to some of his later albums. I first heard his music while working offshore in about 1982 and have been hooked ever since. If you like Jersey Girl then I would advise listening the the album The Heart of Saturday Night or Nighthawks at the Diner.

      Delete
  24. First of all - I never met a Tom Waits tune I didn't love!
    Now, as to the post. Hell yes, music is my friend. I would say, by times, my only friend. Not so much now but it was dependable when some humans in my younger years weren't.
    And I've had a few friends that needed time to appreciate. I think though that I'm usually the one that folks need extra time with. Yep. I'm not always the easiest as I can be rather blunt. I know my pals would tell you though that I'm true blue and kind too. Looking forward to the battle.

    ReplyDelete
  25. It's funny that we gravitate to music or people because we like it or him/her. We don't know exactly why but we just have a natural affinity to that music or person. I have always loved classical music and I loved musicals but I had to grow to love certain rock music. Loved the Beatles but needed to grow inwardly to appreciate and enjoy the music of Jimi Hendrix. I have always been open to people and some were just natural to like. There are 2 brothers I am great friends with. The younger brother I met first and we just clicked. He is gregarious, open and fun. I met his brother later and did not instantly take to him but now I value his friendship over the younger brother. They are both great but the older brother has been there for me through thick and thin. He is more dependable and has a very clever wit. he is often overshadowed by his brother. My other great friend told me that when he first met me he thought I was stuck up and a real snot. I told him I was so scared moving out that I actually tried my best to be outgoing and it still didn't work:) Thankfully he took the time to get to know me and we are so close we are like brother and sister

    ReplyDelete

Go ahead and say something. Don't be afraid to speak your mind.
I normally try to respond to all comments in the comment section so please remember to check the "Email follow-up comments" box if you want to participate in the comment conversation.

For Battle of the Bands voting the "Anonymous" commenting option has been made available though this version is the least preferred. If voting using "anonymous" please include in your comment your name (first only is okay) and city you are voting from and the reason you chose the artist you did.

If you know me and want to comment but don't want to do it here, then you can send me an email @ jacksonlee51 at aol dot com.

Lee