The Manhattan Project--2016 A to Z Theme

Always a work in progress--welcome to my blog...

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

May I Ask A Question?

Question markQuestion mark (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

          In deference to this week's A to Z Challenge Reflections, I will keep my posts here very short today and Friday.   Be sure to enter your Challenge Reflections on the Linky list and please visit those who are listed there already.  There are some excellent posts.

         Today I have two questions for you:

         1)   Do you enjoy blog posts that only have a question for you to answer in the comment section?

         2)   Do you prefer deep questions that require a thoughtful answer or lighter questions that ask something about you, your experiences, or your preferences?






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59 comments:

  1. I don't mind any sort of those questions I will answer to the best of my albilty.

    Yvonne.

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  2. Honestly Lee, it really depends on the question. Usually when I'm doing a hugely lengthy blog run I don't like to dwell too much on writing out essays in response unless it's something really good.

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  3. I love it when bloggers leave questions at the end of the posts; it's a chance to engage with the content in a way other than just saying 'great post!'. I'm good with both deep and light questions too. I always try to put a question at the end of my posts so even the people who skim the post or cry 'Too long, didnt read' can still participate in the discussion.

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  4. I like questions - that's without a doubt. On balance, I think one that requires a fairly short answer is best (like this one!).

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  5. It depends. I follow a great many bloggers. It usually takes me a couple of hours each day to read through all the posts. I enjoy everything I read, but toward the end, I don't really want to answer any deep questions.

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  6. Like YeamieWaffles, I'm not a big fan of questions. In fact, I see them and sigh and say, really? I have to THINK now? heheheh... sometimes at the end of a long day it's too hard to think.

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  7. I don't usually answer the questions. I'm just happy to get to read the post and leave a brief comment.

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  8. I've learned to always end my posts with a couple questions as it spurs conversation. Simple and easy answers are better though. If it's early in the morning, my brain is not prepared for an intelligent, deep answer.

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  9. Jamie left some great questions at the end of his posts during the A - Z -- loved those! Check some of them out to see what I mean.

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  10. I don't mind coming across the occasional question that helps me to think through someone's post. I don't mind a VERY occasional post that is no more than a question. I tend to not do the "ask a question" thing on my own blog too too often and I believe only once did I simply ask a question...no plans to do that again. Deep questions/light questions...nine times out of time my answer will lean to the humerous and flippant regardless of the seriousness of the issue. That's just the way she rolls lol.

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  11. I don't think I have a preference - answering depends on how much time I have.

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  12. I don't mind almost any type of question. I have found however, that for me - and maybe not for any one else - but for me, if a post if too long, (500+ words) I won't read it carefully enough to want to think through an answer. I found posts are getting too long and involved. But that is just me.

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  13. I don't mind questions at the end of a post. If I have something to say, I'll say it. If not, I won't.

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  14. I like both really. On the light-hearted fun side, I think answering questions is a fun way to interact. The deep thinking ones are great because many times, I haven't thought about it before. Getting my brain fired up is always a excellent, left brain or right brain its good to work the neurons.

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  15. yes, I think any questions are good, but it just depends on my mood on the day if I will answer them... doesn't matter, deep or light.
    It's a great way to engage your followers and make them active, it's always only a fraction who respond.

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  16. On some postings it is easier to comment if there are questions, that's just my opinion though.

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  17. I do enjoy questions, but I prefer the answers to be short only because of time. If I could spend all day on the computer, I'd love to learn more about everyone from deeper responses.
    Karen

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  18. I like both and I noticed if I asked a question it encouraged readers to comment. So, both serious and light are good, just like our moods. BTW, you gave me a great idea--I am going to market positive attitudes toward grandparents by calling them "grand parents" splitting the word." More later.

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  19. i like any question it helps to make a better comment

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  20. I like questions and use them if I'm having trouble giving a personal opinion. I also don't mind light or deep questions, but answering a deep question requires more time on my part that I may or may not have.

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  21. I think when you ask your readers in a lighter manner; " so tell me folks what's your experience?" or " any thoughts?" [there are tons of ways to say it actually]; then that gives them the no pressure option to share as much or as little as they want

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  22. It doesn't bother me. I do my best to answer them :)

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  23. I love questions as they get my brain moving. Questions which require simple answers are best for me. Once in a while, I enjoy deep questions which require thoughtful replys about experiences I have had. So's, I really answered your question here, didn't I??? *sigh* Brain mush. A to Z. *waving*

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  24. 1) Do you enjoy blog posts that only have a question for you to answer in the comment section? Yes.

    2) Do you prefer deep questions that require a thoughtful answer or lighter questions that ask something about you, your experiences, or your preferences? It depends on the amount of time I have. I do like the debate questions people put up. But, I think most people like to talk about themselves so asking a question about our preferences or experiences always goes over well.

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  25. I guess for me, if I enjoyed the post and have something to say, I'll answer the question. and then it doesn't matter the type .. however, I probably avoid the deep ones. I'm a pretty shallow person.

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  26. I enjoy answering questions in the comment section. It doesn't really matter to me what the question asks of me, but if I had to choose, deep questions are usually pretty entertaining.

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  27. i don't tend to ask questions, so i guess that means i don't enjoy them all that much--but if i do answer them, either kind is fine---they do help if i have no idea what the post is about, honestly

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  28. I'll be honest here. While I totally don't mind questions and they don't bother me at all, in fact I do like them, I prefer to have the bloggers thoughts on the question as well, or something like that.

    Sarah Allen
    (my creative writing blog)

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  29. Thank you for your answers to my questions. I guess I probably framed this post incorrectly, but then if I had asked exactly what I had wanted it might have defeated my purpose. I enjoyed your answers nevertheless though I guess it doesn't come to any ultimate conclusion other than there are many different opinions on this topic.

    Lee

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  30. I think many of us follow multiple blogs so we come across blogs that do and don't ask questions and ask quick or more deep kind of questions.

    I tend to be a bit vague on the deeper questions. The problem with online interaction is there is no use of body language or intonation and we rely on words alone. Sometimes people misinterpret this and I've seen the internet blow up several times because of this. I think every question has it's place - and this was a good one :)

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  31. Generally, I find that the questions at the ends of blog posts are completely superficial and asked in a rhetorical way. Sometimes, they barely have anything to do with the post. I dislike this. If I have a comment, it's going to be about something from your post, not an answer to some barely related question just so you can have a question. If your blog post -says- something, if it is of consequence, you won't need a question to prompt people with something to say about it.

    As you may have figured out, I prefer blogs that have what I would call real content rather than just being "yea! yea! you can do it!" blogs. If you write contemplative, thoughtful posts, those will naturally lead to comments.

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  32. I like the irony of your post. ;)

    I like them both. Depending on the day, I prefer one over the other.

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  33. Rebecca -- Misinterpretation is easy. In a way I've caused it in my framing of this post. It's best to be very clear in the questions one is asking.

    Andrew -- I hear what you're saying, but I disagree in part. Sometimes an off the wall question might be acceptable if the post has been of the nature of, say for example, a rant. Maybe lightening the mood to move the readers attention back to himself might be appropriate unless the writer really wants the opinion of others.
    However, a post of substantive content might gain clarification or other viewpoints by asking a question or questions. I don't like to come off as pedantic or arrogant as though I have stated the final word on something. A question provides a prompt that opens a topic for conversation or discussion. Questions can also provide openings for other dimensions of the topic at hand.
    I've also found from experience that readers often need the stimulative prompt of a question to draw them in to engage more before they leave a blog. No matter how interesting or controversial my statement may be another party may just be willing to drop things at the end if they aren't directly asked for their opinion.
    I've found that ending a post with a question generally receives a greater reaction than no question. Some readers want to be invited to engage. I want to leave amiable closing that tells the reader that I want engagement. For me--and many others--the question does it. I won't knock that any more than I'll be impolite to somebody who interacts with trivialities when I encounter them in a passing social setting.

    Lee

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  34. Southpaw -- Thanks for getting it. This post was intended primarily as an ironic throwaway, but with a serious query in mind.

    Lee

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  35. No, I understand the -point- of the question, and I agree with the theory. I'm just saying that in practice, the questions usually tagged on at the end usually feel just that, like they were tagged on at the end. Basically, "I've written this post; now, what question can I ask that relates to it?" I think, if you're going to ask a question, that's where you should start. The question should be there and the post should support the question so that it feels like an actual conversation rather than talking about some topic for a few paragraphs and then tossing on "and what is your favorite flavor of ice cream?"

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  36. Hi Lee .. it depends on the subject matter - if I 'hit' a blog at the wrong time and there's no time for me to answer, but I want to leave a relevant comment - then I'll keep the post to answer on my return.

    So - both ways .. depends how much you want from us in the answers ..

    Cheers and thank you so much for all you did for the A - Z .. Hilary

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  37. Andrew -- I totally understand the point you're making. I think sometimes it has something to do with a blogger's style and the expectations of their audience.
    The blogs that I generally read are relatively light and address an audience who is looking for entertainment of sorts. That audience is generally also looking for reciprocal visits to their own blogs. The ongoing banter between blogger and audience is usually like that between friends--sometimes serious and other times off the wall.
    I've seen some more scholastic types of blogs that are very deep and have an audience that may be more involved in discourse and response. It would be totally out of place to see one of those scholars ask about ice cream. There is often discussion without questions but it's just as likely to see specific or rhetorical questions asked--especially in philosophical discussions. Expectations of seriousness are inherent in those forums.
    The real problem in my post today is that I posed this incorrectly. My real question was wondering if readers would enjoy a blog post with absolutely no preliminary discussion and only one or two questions.
    Unfortunately, I did not approach this correctly, although I think Southpaw kind of got what I was doing. I was shooting for the irony of asking the question if readers liked a post that was only a question. More of my weirdness, but it could have been done better.
    Thanks for coming back to this. It's cool when people comment and leave open the prospect for discussion--rarely happens.

    Hilary -- I agree. Sometimes if one is too busy or doesn't have time it's difficult to become overly involved. Thanks for being such an active part of the A to Z. Your posts were among those with actual content. I hope Andrew checked them out.

    Lee

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  38. Sometimes it's nice to have a question to answer beyond the "nice post" response. Lighter questions are probably much quicker to answer than deeper ones, though.

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  39. Well, I'm a fan of the prospect for conversation. I never leave those "great post" comments, because, well
    1. everyone does those, so it's not adding anything
    2. it's closed off and doesn't invite further comment

    Yeah, I know I'm kind of ornery and contrary. In fact, I have an unfinished post about my contrariness, but there's been so much going on, I haven't felt like it really fits in, right now.

    And, you know, I get that most people want light and superficial, which is what I was also talking about in my reflection post. I get it. I just don't like it very much. Culturally, I think we are too much about light and superficial and not enough about substance. But that's kind if my own issue, I guess.

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  40. depends on the question... I don't like ones that make my brain hurt

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  41. Like baygirl32 just above, it depends on the question, and the time of day I'm reading - which of course you have no control over!

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  42. 2) I prefer deep questions that require a thoughtful answer!

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  43. As I tell the young'uns. You can ask but there are no guarantees on answers, lol!

    Serious, I enjoyed reading the posts. The questions asked depended upon the article.

    My support in A-Z has never been about the race for followers. It's always been about finding interesting people to follow or read. Not racing through and skimming and slapping comments. I don't do skim and slap.

    Personally, each blogger has to be true to themselves when it comes to writing. When we write anything the target audience has to be taken into consideration, but don't sell your soul for it.

    Sia McKye OVER COFFEE

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  44. Questions are some of my very favourite things! :)

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  45. I like a question if there is a bit of a 'why I'm asking' but want the blogger to engage me first. The JUST a question is more like a Facebook thing to me--there I love it. And FB, I'd prefer light, mostly, where on the blog... depends. If it's sort of funny, light is fine, but if it engages me in a thoughtful topic, I like that, too.

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  46. I enjoy questions and reading what everyone else answers. The deep or light depends on how much time I have - which is no help at all to you since you won't know how much time I have.

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  47. Well there you go: Ask a question and you'll get a lot of comments. Hmmm--maybe that will call for another blogging experiment in the future.

    Lee

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  48. It totally depends on the question. If it means something, then I'll answer it. If it's just a throw-in, I don't bother. I prefer deeper questions because it's more interesting...

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  49. I appreciate both and I know which blogs will give me each kind of question. When I'm hurrying to get through, I go to the quick Q/A and save the ones with deep questions for when I can consider the post and my answer.

    Maybe this is a kind of cop out, but really it's time that is a huge factor. The second is, of course, the kind of blog. Some are so thought-provoking that I want to visit, but I want to visit WELL. I want to give a considered response. Does that make sense?

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  50. Jamie Gibbs response is clear and to the point. You want to attract repeat readers. You should ask a short question that a reader could leave a more detailed response.
    Long posts are a turn off keep them short but post five a day...

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  51. Pat -- It kind of depends on my mood too. Sometimes it easy to just pop off a throwaway answer to a off-the-cuff question just to leave a comment.

    C.Lee-- Time? Time? Who has enough time? I probably run out of time because I'm answering too many thoughtful questions with long drawn-out answers.

    J.L.-- I don't know about posting 5 times per day!!! But short with substance is good.

    Lee

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  52. I prefer deeper thoughtful questons that might lead to my wriiting my own post about it:) thanks for visiting my enigma challenge post!

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  53. lighter questions please. I don't want to spend an hour ruminating about your blog; i don't have time!!



    Mimi Torchia Boothby

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  54. I think there is definitely value to asking a question. For one thing, I know that personally I am more likely to leave a comment if the writer prompts me and provides something specific for me to react to. I've also noticed that many of my friends in real life are finally starting to leave comments on my blog and engage in the comments section now that they see that there is actually some conversation happening and it's not just me talking into the void, as it were.

    I think it can be tricky to ask the right question, though. Sometimes I don't ask a question because I feel anything I'd say would be trite or would minimize the impact of what I was trying to say.

    I also think the well-used question can spark great conversation. Sometimes the conversations in the comments is incredibly interesting. I'm looking at you, Andrew Leon and Arlee Bird.

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  55. Hello, Lee! I stopped by to say thank you for your kind comments and well wishes for my son George and his music; for posting it on your FB and Twitter, and for taking the time... he has his debut album coming out within the week/s and if you like this one, I think you'll love the other 14!

    PS: as for questions: I am generally an open book, but have been learning to not tell it all at my ripe ole age. :)

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  56. Usually if I am drawn to comment, it's because of something said within an article. Sometimes a question may prompt me to leave a note, but typically I feel moved to speak --- either in enthusiastic agreement or in heated argument. I will also comment if advice is being sought, but this happens less frequently as I don't typically have any answers. And I do like attempting to offer comfort.

    I guess, to answer your second question, if there is no content beyond a question, or if the content does not strike me a particular way, I probably won't comment. So why did I do it this time, you ask? It seemed like the thing to do, lolz! Plus, your "start here" page asked me to say hello when stopping by.

    Howdy! Andi-Roo wuz here! :)

    Andi-Roo /// @theworld4realz
    http://www.theworld4realz.com/
    theworldforrealz@gmail.com

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  57. Yup, I do. I like to leave a question at the end of a post quite often myself and I look forward to the answers I get.
    Sometimes I tend to lose interest if a post is super long and not about a subject I can relate to.
    But a short one I will almost always read.

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  58. FTR, I almost always ask questions...the posts I do not are pictorials or the stream of consciousness/random thought type, which inevitably get questions asked to me.

    Personally, I prefer questions, but not solitary ones unless I know the blog owner is hanging in the background for a real time discussion (I do this on occasion, and it is fun.).

    Since this is very much an audience preference kind of deal (time, interest in topic, stamina for a long answer), I typically leave open a buffet...three to five questions calling for anything from a one word answer to a dissertation, if the tea is warm enough.

    Seems like this experiment worked.
    Red.

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  59. Red -- I think the experiment worked very well. I have some of the best readers around. They surprise me sometimes in how willing they are to indulge my whims and forgive my missteps. I too like to leave more than one question at the end of a post. Hopefully one of them will be the question the reader wants to answer.

    Lee

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Go ahead and say something. Don't be afraid to speak your mind.
I normally try to respond to all comments in the comment section so please remember to check the "Email follow-up comments" box if you want to participate in the comment conversation.

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If you know me and want to comment but don't want to do it here, then you can send me an email @ jacksonlee51 at aol dot com.

Lee