The Manhattan Project--2016 A to Z Theme

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Monday, September 7, 2015

Question of the Month & BOTB Results




         The Question of the Month is hosted by Michael G D'Agostino from A Life Examined.  The first Monday of each month I'll be answering a question posed by Michael prior to event day.  Click on the link to his blog for more participants.   

      Here is this month's question:

“What’s the best job you’ve ever had?”

      Retirement certainly has a plus side and is an especially good gig if you've got a great pension plan or some other generous access to financial resources with the good health to enjoy it all.   Unfortunately, though I've got the health, I am limited by the finance part, but then again aren't most of us?   I'm enjoying a lot of aspects of retirement, but it's not as good as the best job I've ever had.

      Perhaps it's my glass half full attitude that's made my work life seem so blessed.  In every job that I've had over the years I've always managed to find something good about each of them.  There has been no job that I've absolutely hated.  On the contrary, I've been thankful to have had the employment that I have found--or has found me--and each job contributed something positive to my life besides the obvious benefit of a paycheck.  A positive attitude does wonders for what can potentially be a tedious and uncomfortable circumstance.

       My employment history has included stints as a golf caddy, construction worker, telephone solicitor, delivery person, limo driver, warehouse worker, dishwasher, marketing research data collector, retail sales associate, show promoter, general business manager, cold caller, and entertainer.  I can't say that I loved every one of these jobs, but each one served a purpose in its season and added value to my personal growth.

        Of all of the jobs in my life, the ones related to the entertainment industry have been the best.  Growing up in a family that regularly worked professional gigs as a juggling act, I fell in love with being on stage, entertaining before audiences, and the whole lifestyle that went with the profession.  Since my father had a normal day job, we had bookings set up for weekends, evenings, or vacation times.   Juggling was a sideline for our family, but it was a great way to pick up extra money and have a darn good time while doing so.  Early in my life I decided that one day I wanted to have a full-time career in the entertainment industry.

       In 1975 the opportunity to fulfill the dream I had so long harbored was presented to me with an offer to join the Ken Griffin Magic and Illusion Show.  The Griffin's were a seasoned husband and wife team with a notable history in the entertainment industry.  They had written a book--Illusion Show Know How--which gained them a large following among working magicians as well as the dreamers who hoped to one day to pursue careers in stage magic.  Starting my solo entertainment career with the Griffins was an ideal way to break into the business.

Emulating the flamboyant 70's style of disco magic, here I am at the conclusion of the famous Houdini Metamorphosis Trunk Escape as presented with the Ken Griffin Magic Show at the 1976 Abbott's Magic Get-Together in Colon, Michigan.  Being on stage can feel pretty great!
     As much as I enjoyed working on the Ken Griffin Magic Show, the bookings were not enough to keep us working as much as I would have liked and this in turn resulted in my not making enough money to support me and the wife who I had married while working on the show.  They did not have a regular agent booking a consistent tour so we began doing our own bookings and promotion prior to each show.  In doing this I learned a lot about those aspects of show business, but my preference was to tour and perform.   Another opportunity was offered to me in 1978 and this was much more to my liking.


The World of Fantasy

        I was living my dream with the Ken Griffin Show, but I still had a fantasy about touring without having to do the booking and promoting work.  Then my fantasy became a reality as I entered a world of fantasy.  That is, The World of Fantasy Players, a troupe run by magic entertainer and diverse businessman Philip Morris from Charlotte, North Carolina.  

         On visiting a Ken Griffin Show performance in Gastonia, North Carolina, Philip Morris offered my wife and I a job with his touring show.  The World of Fantasy Players presented theatrical stage versions of popular children's stories that incorporated music, dance, and magic.  Each year the show toured throughout the U.S. and Canada for about nine months.  With the blessing of the Griffins, my wife and I accepted Philip's offer to join the Players troupe.

        As the story turns out, my stint with The World of Fantasy Players became the best job I ever had.  In my first two years I was a featured performer in the show doing juggling and magic while my wife was one of the actors.  In 1981 I took over as road manager and remained in that position until 1991 when I continued working for Philip Morris managing a costume distribution warehouse in the Los Angeles area.

         There were many things that made my job with the World of Fantasy Players great.  For one thing the extent of the travel was an opportunity that I would have unlikely achieved on my own.  Yearly we crisscrossed North American visiting major places as well as small towns many have never heard of yet been to.   All of this travel--transportation and lodging--was paid by the company and even though we often kept a very busy performance schedule, there was almost always time to sight see and to enjoy the local color of the places we visited.  

         Decent lodging was always included as part of the package.  Especially after I took over management of our road affairs, I made sure that we stayed in nice places that provided the comfort of home away from home.  When my kids were small we could travel with them with no problems.  Later after they started becoming school age we left the road life to settle down.

        Would I do something like this again if I had a chance?   As long as my wife was game to go I'd take a similar job for sure.  Doing exactly what I was doing twenty years ago maybe not so much (though with a show crew doing all of the heavier work it might not be so bad), but I wouldn't mind going back to some kind of touring life.         

        When I hear rock and roll stars or other big entertainers complain about life on the road I have to laugh.  They have it made.  Posh hotels, deluxe transportation, and many other perks--doesn't sound like all that bad of a life to me.  I suppose there are some who have it rougher than others, but over all most of them don't know the kind of life where the stage stars are also the roadies and drivers.  But it's not a bad life when all the conditions are right.   And even if the conditions are not always right, you sure can get some good stories out of it.





       
Battle of the Bands Results:  Another Brick in the Wall

         Another Battle has been waged and it's time for the winner announcement.   On September 1st my song pick was "Another Brick in the Wall" between Daria Plyushko and Gavino Loche.  I had a pretty good idea who would win in this one, but I didn't expect quite the lopsided outcome.  

         After many listenings of the song I was torn.  Sometimes I was in a "Lazy" mood and got into the chill of the Plyushko version.  In the end though I had to hand my vote to the guitar wizardry of Gavino Loche.   I had a lot of voters who went the same way as I did.

Final Voting Results:

Daria Plyushko        7            

Gavino Loche        27

          Another Battle of the Bands will be coming your way on Tuesday September 15th.   That post will be part of an occasional series I'll be doing of versions of some of my favorite songs.   I'm going to try to tie these posts to "Soundtrack of my Life" posts on my Wrote By Rote blog. 

          Have you had a job that has especially stood out for you?    Have you had any jobs that involved extensive traveling or being away from home a lot?   Is there still a special dream job beyond your horizon?


83 comments:

  1. My best jobs were my first job in law in San Francisco, then when I was courted by another firm and then I went to work for them also in the Bay Area...the pay was amazing. And my other fave job was the law job in Washington I worked at for 10 years before moving back east. I never wanted a job that required travel. I need to be at home. I like to travel but on my own terms. My dream job would be to make a good living selling my jewelry and photos. The problem is, I just want to make stuff. I don't like the minutiae of running a business or legwork or craft shows or anything else like that.

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    1. JoJo, you sound like a lot of the writers who would rather just write and let someone else handle the uglier business side. I know how you feel. That's why I left the magic show in favor of the Fantasy show.

      Lee

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  2. All that travel would eventually wear on me. Too much of a homebody.
    Good thing you met up with Morris when you did. You finally got to do it full time.
    I hope you don't still have that shirt...

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    1. Alex, when I start staying at home I become a homebody too--I truly enjoy being settled in at home. But the lure of the road gets strong too.

      I don't know what happened to the shirt--I'd like to have it for "history's" sake. Hey--it was the Disco Era. I only wore it performing that trick and never out in public.

      Lee

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  3. oh my you have had a colorful career - way to go...

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    1. David, I feel fortunate to have had the opportunities that I did.

      Lee

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  4. It doesn't surprise me that entertaining as a magician was your favorite job. Doing what we love and earning a living at it - isn't that heaven? I only got to do what I love after I retired from real jobs - writing and singing, neither of which are bringing me any income to speak of. But they bring me joy.

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    1. Karen, if we don't love the work we do then in some ways we might be wasting that part of our life. Even the "real" jobs have something positive to offer if we look hard enough at them. Paychecks are a definite benefit.

      Lee

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  5. Hi, Lee! This is a terrific post describing your favorite job. It must have been very exciting to travel around the continent performing a juggling act and illusions in an entertainment troupe and feeding off the energy of appreciative audiences, "children of all ages." I had quite a few jobs that were similar to yours. I was a shoe clerk, construction worker, welder, telephone solicitor/cold caller, delivery guy, "case worker" for a beer distributor, motivational seminar trainer and TV newsman, cameraman, videographer, editor and announcer. My favorite job is the one I often discuss on music posts - working with rock bands and Playboy centerfolds as production manager of an MTV style station in the 80s and 90s.

    Singing model Daria purred like a kitten but only a few of us appreciated it. I'm sorry she lost the battle but glad you introduced me to her.

    Thanks, Lee!

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    1. Shady, we do have very similar work experiences. The telephone solicitor and cold calling is probably the worst from my point of view though I did enjoy doing telephone surveys. Your TV jobs sound like an interesting and fun time.

      Lee

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  6. I would have enjoyed all that traveling and meeting people. People are fascinating. Great post, I enjoyed it.

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    1. Ann, I met so many cool people on the road. Also I feel like people are often willing to open up more when you're in show business. I was treated to so many cool experiences by the people I met.

      Lee

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  7. I love reading about your days of being a rock star in the juggling/magic world. What a job that would have been, bad shirts or not. There's just no replacement for getting up on a stage and wowing people (we can't juggle, so we have to rely on our words).

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    1. BeerBoys, I never achieved much stardom though sometimes in a small town with a crowd of adoring kids we did feel like stars in a way. The adrenaline rush and satisfaction of having done another show successfully is like nothing else I've known. It's a fuel that keeps the road warrior going on to the next podunk.

      Lee

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  8. Your life stories are so interesting. Thanks for sharing them. The entertainers life is bumpy, for sure. I hope you get the chance to use your multiple talents on the road again.
    Play off the Page

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    1. Mary, I was fortunate to have an entertainment position that was pretty smooth going most of the time. Having good agents, promoters, and a home base team made our road life pretty easy.

      Lee

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  9. You've had such an adventuresome life. I would have found that very exciting when I was younger though constant travel wouldn't be my choice now. I love being home.

    Susan Says

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    1. Susan GK, not everyone is cut out for road life. We lost a few along our way, but fortunately most stayed til the end of the tours. I'm a big fan of staying home, but once I start out on the road I want to keep going. So much to see and do and when the work is something I like and it pays decently then I'm where I want to be.

      Lee

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  10. You're had a lot of neat jobs. And to be on the Ken Griffin Magic and Illusion Show? How cool is that? I'm glad you got to realize that dream.

    Well, I was on the losing team this time. But that's okay. :)

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    1. Chrys, in my Battles every team is a winner. I almost voted for Daria Plyushko myself because it was so relaxing to listen to.

      Lee

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  11. We worked our first job ... working for Morris Costumes....
    ... I was 18 at the time... That was so long ago....
    the Owner Phil Morris, knew many Magicians (Vince Carmine was even rehearsing at the warehouses for about a month... And the Haniford Circus (was also owned by him... so got to meet many of the performers... All in All ... a great job... the best I ever had...
    He had been a TV "Horror Host" on and off for years... (I was his "butler" for a special Halloween broadcast....

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    1. Dr Theda, do I know you? Now you've got me more curious. I was aware of your Halloween passion, but had no idea that you'd worked for Morris as well.

      I used to spend a lot of time with Vince Carmen and visited the Hanneford show a number of times and even worked in their show specs a couple of times. We always rehearsed our shows in the Morris warehouse in February (it could get cold!). I was with the Fantasy show from 1977 to 1991 so maybe we encountered each other?

      I worked for Philip Morris for 32 years until the Morris California operation closed in 2009. The Morris's are great people. I visited them this past summer and it was great seeing their "new" warehouse (they've been there several years now but it was my first visit) and it was especially wonderful spending time with Phil and Amy and the rest of their family.

      Send me an email if you'd like at jacksonlee51 at aol dot com.

      Lee

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    2. We were able to speak with Amy a couple of years ago ... they were All well... Jim Lawrence is an old Friend as well... We were there in 81-82... So you would have known Dave Serrif... him and his wife Debbie left Morris back then...
      Cool Great to know that you know them, good Sir...

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    3. And should you speak to Phil or Amy... tell them that Stacey said "Hello"....

      Delete
    4. Got it, Stacey! I know Jim Lawrence very well. I did know Dave Serrif a bit, but that was near the time he left and Eddy Wade took his place. I knew Eddy quite well. My wife and I used to stay at his apt during rehearsal. I think he and Phil worked up some kind of arrangement to provide lodging. Eddy was pretty cool and a hoot to be around.

      But yeah, I would have been there to rehearse and turn in the show at the Morris Warehouse at 3108 Monroe Road. Pretty cool.

      Lee

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    5. Eddie Wade ... after They had me spend nearly a week Sorting out the Massive amount of "returns" (after the Halloween season...) Eddie (by Phil"s orders )... Consolidated and moved all that I had worked on that week... came in that next morning and saw that ... went




      thid orter aham Soov complained to Dave and Jim... And went home for the day ... Dave (who had assigned me the task of sorting it all to make checking it all back in much lyuick ) argued at Phil for having done so... And (that may have contributed to his leaving... Took him over three week to go through all of the returns... (would have only taken about a week if everything was still sorted... and I refused to Sort the same stuff again... So memories of Eddie Wade were not our best... And as ( I guess some sort of "punishment) had to pull an order of 366 gross of (Gordon Wheeler) foam Clown Noses... Jeff McEnlytosh (Fay's Son) was helping me for most of the first day and started to loose it at the overwhelming task... so we bagged most of the large order myself...
      and Dave had words with Phil over making the checking in of returns much more of a burden... for those few weeks he was no longer at upbeat person that he always was... But we have So many "Good" Memories from our time there....

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    6. Things happen when you're working with others. I hated the returns. I seem to remember seeing a room full of them each time we were there rehearsing. I got them at my Los Angeles office too, but nowhere near as many as Charlotte got.

      Lee

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    7. Phil's "return Policy" was what helped many small businesses and Dave had me organize them all from the mess... when I came into work (and saw my work that I had done) Eddie had all the boxes in 15 to 18 foot tall stacks three layers deep... I just "lost it"
      Dave was never his same "Cheerful" self after that... and not long later he left... and this was nor a "room"... this was Phil's Largest warehouse...So quite a few boxes...

      Delete
  12. Your "best" job was more exciting than any I have ever held. Like you, I have enjoyed things about every job I ever had. My two favs were my third job in the Traffic Dept of a local lumber mill. I lined up transportation for the orders, rail and truck. Talked to wonderful people all over the USA. The other was at the front desk of a local oil distributor. Again, it was the loggers and oilfield people I spoke to that made it such a joy.

    I don't interact with folks outside of my current company much. But I enjoy my job very much. There is a great bunch of people I work with and I like the problem solving that comes up often.

    Life & Faith in Caneyhead

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    1. Barbara, if we look hard enough (and usually not that hard) there is something good about every job. Even in my short stint washing dishes I met some good folks and we were able to fix any food we wanted when it wasn't busy. I tanked up on chocolate milk. I'll admit it was an unusual dishwashing job--not in a restaurant--so it was probably better than the typical dishwasher job.

      Problem solving has always been a big draw for me in a job. Hope you keep your job for as long as you want to be there.

      Lee

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  13. How fun! What a great time that sounds like.

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    1. HR, Great time is definitely what that job was.

      Lee

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  14. My dream job is still being a paleoanthropologist, archaeologist, or paleontologist, but I know that usually doesn't pay very well. As I know from doing a few archaeologist for a day activities in Israel, it's just as likely to spend an entire day coming up with nothing but dirt and some pottery fragments than finding anything new and exciting.

    I really liked some of the temp jobs I did, like coding insurance applications at the Berkshire Life bank and being a holistic grader for students' exams. I loved seeing the interesting stories revealed on all those insurance applications, like colorful medical histories and the 20-year-old agent who tried to get away with witnessing his own signature. Sadly, there's almost no decent temp work in my area anymore.

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    1. Carrie-Annie, "holistic grader"? Now that sounds different. I've thought about going the temp route, but haven't made the leap yet. There probably isn't much for me here anyway.

      One of my past Morris Fantasy cohorts got his degree in paleontology after leaving "show biz" and now he and his paleontologist wife go around during the school year getting paid to do theatrical presentations about dinosaurs and such. He's combined two loves to make a living. Each summer he and his wife go to someplace like the Dakotas to participate in digs. He seems pretty happy about what he's doing now.

      Lee

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  15. I think the dream job is the one I have now. When I was a young teen I thought that I just wanted to help people-how? I had no idea. For the past 24 years I have been a Credit Counsellor and feel that I have helped many people overcome their financial stress. I helped them budget, pay their debts down and show them another way to be rid of the debt whether is turned out to be bankruptcy, remortgaging or selling their home. I have never traveled for my job but I have a feeling I would always need my home base to come back to. I have a friend who is out on the road more than he is home. I always had a dream of working in an art museum or being a tour guide. I love art and travel but never made that clear when I was young due to fear (I was severely bullied so I didn't want to get even more bullied). I love that you worked as a magician and that shirt! It is the 70's:)

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    1. Birgit, it's nice to know when you are able to help people. That's one aspect of being in management that I liked--being able to give people jobs and to help customers with whatever they needed. Credit counseling is a very important service and I commend you for helping others in such a positive way.

      I have a son-in-law who is the director at a university art gallery and he seems to enjoy his job. His college major was in regard to museums so he's doing what he loves.

      In the 70's we wore some pretty wild clothes, yeah?

      Lee

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  16. I love reading your stories about life on the road, Lee. Sounds like a blast! In my previous corporate career, I took a few business trips and those were always fun. No extensive travelling, though. My best job ever is the one I still have, taking care of dogs when their owners are away. It'll never make me rich, but I love it! ☺ Hubby and I have deferred retirement for a couple more years at least because we want to enjoy a few more costly adventures before settling down. The financial aspect of retirement is a bit of a concern, for sure, but life is short and we have to enjoy the now. Probably not a good strategy, but it's always been the way we roll, for better or worse.

    The battle results didn't surprise me. A great guitar solo is hard to beat!

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    1. Debbie D--That Gavino was definitely a pretty cool guitar player.

      If one can keep good health and in income that will allow it, I think a person should travel as much as they can. I've seen elderly tourists in wheelchairs and using walking aids--I don't think I'd want to go to that extent, but I've gotta admire some of those folks.

      Lee

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  17. Lee, it looks like I picked another winner in the Sept. 1st BOTB. :D You truly amaze me with your life! I loved reading about your work history in the entertainment business. I never had a job outside the home to equal the enjoyment I had while raising my kids. Part of me is toying with the idea of entering the work force as soon as we get DH's job situation straightened out, but I don't know if that's what I really want to do or just like the idea. I never traveled with any of my jobs, but always thought that would be nice to do...just a little. Our retirement years aren't too far away. I know finances will not be perfect with all of our setbacks over the years. I guess all we can do is the best we can! Have a tunetastic week!

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    1. Cathy, other than our juggling act, my mother never worked outside the home. She was always nearby when I was growing up and had dinner on the table every night when my father got home. I'm glad she did it that way.

      Life is always filled with uncertainty, but things seem to work out. At least that's been my experience.

      Lee

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  18. LEE ~
    That photograph of you... Dang, man! Never woulda guessed it was you had you not said it was. You looked like a hippie, dude!

    Yeah, I could see the outcome of this BOTB early on. That guitarist was just too good. The only way he could have been beaten is if he'd gone up against a singer who delivered the song with a lot of passion. The "lazy" approach, on the other end of the spectrum, was never gonna get it done against Gavino Loche.

    ~ D-FensDogG
    'Loyal American Underground'

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    1. STMcC, that photo of me is so bizarre. I was trying to emulate the darker haired guy with Sigfreid and Roy. I could have passed for a hippy I suppose. They were strange times in fashion and everything else.

      I kept wavering on my vote as I would get really chilled and grooving to Daria. But the flashy guitar stuff was done so tastily that I couldn't not vote for it.

      Lee

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  19. Wow, you sure had quite a few. But that magic show sure sounds like fun through and through. Retirement with lots of money would sure be nice as well, but yeah, hardly ever happens.

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    1. Pat, I know of some people who are doing very well in retirement. As I mentioned in some comment above, life is unpredictable and sometimes it doesn't matter what our plans were, but in the end it's all about what actually happens.

      Lee

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  20. I'd say retirement is a pretty good deal, but it's cool know that you had a fun job you really liked and would even consider doing it again.

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    1. Toinette, retirement, as does life, requires some means of getting through it successfully. I wish I'd get an interesting offer!

      Lee

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  21. Lee,
    I'm content his time out. I actually picked more BOTB winners than losers... but not in this case. oh well, I stand by a choice (smile). Fun battle.

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    1. I think I might have picked more winners, but I wasn't keeping track. It was all some good music though.

      Lee

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  22. I spent from 1984 to 1995 travelling six months a year for business, and by the end, I was ready to not travel any more.

    We stayed in pretty nice hotels (Parker House in Chicago and King Edward in Toronto come to mind), but unlike you, we usually did not have much in the way of free time.

    All that said, had it not been for those companies, I probably would have never left the US, and they sent me as far away as Seoul, to London (my favorite place in the world) several times, to Paris once, and to Phoenix so often it seemed easier to just move here.

    Like you, I can find good in every position I have held. But I am glad I no longer live out of s suitcase.

    LC

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    1. Larry, attitude is the crux of enduring any situation. If you can stay positive you can feel a whole lot better.

      Free time is pretty important to me if I'm going to have to travel. But I guess if you're there to work a lot then it like being at home on your regular job but staying in a nice hotel every night.

      If that made any sense.

      Lee

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  23. Your job history is sure a lot more interesting than mine, and it sounds like you had tons more fun. This Q & A idea is great!

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    1. Patricia, and yet if you told me your job history I might be very interested in hearing it. I think many of us are just naturally curious to know what other people do. I know I am.

      Lee

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  24. Magic? Cool! If I had to guess what someone's job was, I would not guess magic and illusion. It's not a common job. At least I don't think it is. Perhaps magicians are all around me, and I don't know it. I am a mere muggle.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. Janie, magic is not a real common job, but there might be more working magicians than one might think.

      Lee

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  25. I guess the best job I had was the one I held prior to being laid off in 2003 (which in itself had a silver lining). I worked for a state library, first on a project that dealt with cataloging/microfilming old newspapers, then working in the public records dept. Since history, American or otherwise, was/is my favorite topic of choice, I was in seventh heaven. Been trying to get back there ever since.

    No dream job to speak of.

    Father Nature's Corner

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    1. GB, working in a library seems kind of cool to me. I enjoy being in libraries though I've never worked in one.

      Lee

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  26. Always impressed with you artist types that can tour endlessly. I like travelling but.... like to come home too. Best friend, Steve Hackett, is still touring at 65 and doing three months almost non-stop at the moment. Gigs almost every night, But leaves the young'uns to do the heavy lifting.

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    1. Roland, that roadie work can be kind of taxing on an aging body, but it's also good exercise.

      Lee

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  27. So much travel. I wouldn't want to be on the road all the time, but after doing over 300 bookstore and library appearances over the years, I know what it feels like.

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    1. L.Diane, personal appearances certainly are in a similar vein to stage performances.

      Lee

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  28. I swear, you've led one of the most fascinating lives! I can imagine how letting go could make a person anxious for the good ole days, even when you're quite content with the memories.
    I've had my share of jobs but the most memorable was where I stayed the longest because of the tangible sense of belonging, being an integral part of the process (and progress). I was an executive's assistant then, but now I find that being the executive is even better ;-)

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    1. Diedre, being in charge definitely has its perks even though there might be more accountability and responsibility involved.

      Lee

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  29. Sounds like you've enjoyed quite a number of adventures. Wish I could say the same. I couldn't even tell you what is the most interesting job I had. I worked at a temp agency once, and I guess that was kind of interesting. I got the chance to work at the airport for two weeks. I love airports. But it was the most boring job. Greeting travellers as they checked in (at the back of the line) to hand them survey cards the airline wanted them to fill out. I literally stood for seven hours a day asking people to fill out survey cards.

    As for the battle, I'm still upset the first song ended so abruptly. I wonder if that lost a few votes. Because it did in my case.

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    1. Jeffrey, like I said in another comment, sometimes a job one person thinks is boring might be very interesting to another. That airport job sounds potentially interesting.

      I didn't like the abrupt ending either. It really broke the mood the song had put me in.

      Lee

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    2. There was a reason of all the menial jobs I've ever had, the airport one is top on the list of ones to mention. As a writer, I find a lot of inspiration there. In fact, I do a lot of my writing at the airport. I'll bring my laptop, park in the structure, and write for a few hours a night, when I'm so inclined.

      Delete
    3. Jeffrey, I liked airports better before all of the security measures were put in place. I used to enjoy waiting at gates to watch passengers disembark. At the Knoxville airport I would even go to eat sometimes--now you have to have a plane ticket to get into the food areas.

      Los Angeles airport was always kind of a hassle even before the security checks and too far for me to just go for the heck of it. Airports can be kind of neat, but crowded ones are overly frantic.

      You must go to a smaller airport like the Knoxville one was.

      Lee

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    4. Mitchell International is not the smallest airport I've ever been in, but it certainly isn't Heathrow or O'Hare. Yes, you need a ticket to get to the terminals now, but our airport has a good number of shops before you get to any gates. Walking into the main entrance you have various restaurants, a book store, a ping pong table (of all things), one of those magic gravity wells, coffee shops, a bar and even a shoe shine place. All the wings of the airport are fed into the main, so I still get to see a lot of commotion. Lovers running into each others arms, a crying family who were seeing their mother off, Even though I do a lot of writing. Sometimes I just go to the airport and people watch.

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    5. There are some stories in your description. One could write a book of short stories imagined from your above comment. Now I want to go to the airport--not the one here though.

      Lee

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    6. Yep, I've crafted a few poems and idea for a few short stories from the airport. It's a great resource for me.

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  30. The Ken Griffin Magic and Illusion Show looks like it was fun! I can see the perks of retirement, and the pitfalls to.

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    1. Alissa, my advice to anyone would be prepare for the retirement years. It's an iffy time financially if you don't have the means to require in relative comfort.

      Lee

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  31. The World of Fantasy Players sounds like a lot of fun! I enjoy road-tripping and acting. My dream job would be an entrepreneur/writer and I could set my own schedule and workload each day, and I am taking steps to try to make that a reality :)

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    1. Elizabeth, I like the idea of being in control of my schedule, but it's also nice to have someone take care of things for you.

      Lee

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  32. Bravo to you, Lee. Wow! What a life! I've acted in community theatre and loved it. But now I need to decide to write or run lines with actors. And it's a very difficult decision. I always wanted to be an actress when I was younger. I have five children now, and we get our fill of cross-country and Canada camping with the family. I tell of our adventures on my blog, http://campingwithfivekids.blogspot.com/.

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    1. I love traveling in Canada. Kids can change our plans in a big way.

      Lee

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  33. You have a great history yourself, Arlee. I may be too young to know what my favorite job is, unless writing counts? :)

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  34. Greatt "job story", Lee! I can totally understand how much fun that gig would be. It's amazing that you had a family that juggled, too. Cool!

    Loche was amazing. Thanks for introducing me to his talents!

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    1. Cherdo, I'm thankful that I was born into the family that I was born into.

      Lee

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  35. That sounds like a fantastic job! It's a shame it couldn't support you and your wife though :(

    The Battle sounded interesting, I might go back and check out the songs :)

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    1. Michael, the right offer could support us fine, but waiting for that to come through. Back when I was doing it the job supported my family and me very well.

      Lee

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  36. Your touring job sounds fascinating...and exhausting! I'm glad that you enjoyed it so. My favorite job was working as a broadcast planner/buyer in a Washington, DC advertising agency. I had sooooo much fun in that job. I recently found a daytimer from those days and flipped through it to see all my appointments: I was wined and dined by so many of the radio and TV sales reps in the industry. Almost every day I was taken to lunch and several nights a week I was taken out for Happy Hour. The parties were lavish and exciting. And the agency itself was comprised of amazing people. The setting was perfect: two townhouses in Old Town Alexandria...the bricked streets, the mahogany staircases, the fireplaces in the offices...it was a stunning place to work. The people were incredible. Fun fun fun was the theme of every day. It was hard work for sure and we did alot of media plans and lots of deadline pressures but when you are working with good people who know how to make the job fun, it's so rewarding. I stayed in that job for a few years, then went to another DC ad agency for a short stint before breaking into Sales at the DC Classic Rock radio station (WCXR). That was another fun job. Lots of perks. But this time I was the one doing the wining and dining, instead of being wined and dined. Still a lot of fun. Advertising is a fun business when all the stars line up...
    Michele at Angels Bark

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  37. Michele, your jobs do sound fun and busy. Opportunities to meet interesting people and have unique experiences make for the best jobs.

    Lee

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Lee