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Friday, June 5, 2015

This Ain't No Disco!


    "...this ain't no disco, this ain't no fooling around."   No, this is some serious stuff, my friends!

Disco ball in blue
Disco ball in blue (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

        Remember the saying "Disco Sucks"?   Back in the day you could find T-shirts with the slogan and there was even a special night at a White Sox baseball game when a special anti-disco promotion was held.  The "Disco Sucks" movement has been credited to Detroit rock DJ Steve Dahl who would "blow up" disco records on the air to the delight of his hardcore rock and roll fan base.   

         Some have made the claim that the Disco Sucks movement had undertones of hate toward certain groups of society.  Maybe that was true for some people.  For me I like music because I enjoy the listening experience or I dislike some music because it isn't pleasant for me to hear.  As with any creation I don't necessarily reject it because of who made it or what that creative person believes or believed.  If that were my criteria for accepting things or creations then I would be very limited in what I owned or liked.

        As I've been discussing in recent posts my preferences in music are dependent on what I like to hear in music--what I look for in a musical work.   So if I heard a song that was lyrically superb, expressing ideas with which I was in total agreement, and that song had one of the most beautiful melodies that I had ever heard and I had absolutely enjoyed this song for years and then suddenly one day I learned that the song had been composed by some horrible person--say like Adolph Hitler--would the sound of the song be any different?   

       Sure, it's possible that now with my new knowledge I might start to convince myself to dislike the song or just stop listening to it, but if the work had some endearing quality once, then how is that quality lost by learning something bad about the person who wrote it?   

         Again I'm rambling a bit, but there is a point in there somewhere and maybe you'll want to share your thoughts in the comments.  Actually I started this line of thought because I just wanted to use that line "This ain't no disco" from the Talking Heads song "Life During Wartime".   And I'm not using the line because that's going to be my next Battle of the Bands song choice, but because in my recent song choice "This is a party!".  

         That's what Battle of the Bands should be like--a fun party.  Yes, we might get a bit snide to hopefully only a slight degree and we might poke some good-natured fun at one another or the song choices that are picked.  We all don't have to like the same things and that should be expected.   Let's just have a good time!

So now on with the winning version of "Garden Party"





          I was not overly surprised by the results though I didn't expect Owl City to do quite as well as they did in this match up.   Yes, I expected Johnny Lee to win this, not by a shut-out, but with a resounding victory.  I was right cause that's what happened.  My vote for Johnny Lee doesn't even matter all that much.

Final Tally:

Owl City                15   Votes

Johnny Lee             27  Votes

Coming Soon!
     A new Battle of the Bands will be here on Monday June 15th.   I don't think we'll have the kind of trouncing we had in this most recent Battle.   In fact, due to the nature of the song I don't know whether I'll get anywhere near the votes I got on this contest.   I hope the next song doesn't scare away too many of you because it's a darn good one with versions by two excellent artists.  If you don't like my next song pick then you must be a commie or something.   For that matter you might even like it if you are a commie.   My next song pick has been around for nearly 80 years with the more recent versions that I'll be featuring by a new wave prog rock band that turned it into a mega hit and a singer who was in his nineties when he made his own hit recording of this song that he had recorded decades prior.  Those are the versions you'll be voting on.

            Do you enjoy disco music?   Did you ever "blow up" or destroy disco records?   Any idea what song or artists I'll be coming up with next?

61 comments:

  1. I'm curious as to how a like for a song might suggest I'm a commie. Perhaps I am a commie? Well, more like a social democrat but that is somewhat pink of me. I do love Seeger and Baez so people might be right to be wary. I voted for Lee but that's because I am a Buddhist.

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    1. Jan, I was engaging in some topical political wordplay or something like that. You'll have to come back on June 15th to see what you think.

      Lee

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  2. Oh and I never blew up a disco disc but I did try and buy go go boots once. My mum clamped down pretty hard on that.

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    1. Jan, I tried to get into the mod dress scene prior to disco but I looked so stupid that I didn't attempt to dress in disco duds. I did wear a gold neck chain for a while though.

      Lee

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  3. I used to love Woody Allen films. Then he had an affair with his wife's 18 year old daughter. I've never watched another. So some ideas do seep into my opinion of an art piece.
    But politics, I don't know. I have gotten hardened to people spouting extreme and in my opinion ridiculous opinions. You do have to have a little "float" as they say about belief systems.
    Besides, I came of age during disco. I remember doing the "hustle". Disco was played until we were all so burned out we could live without ever hearing some of the tunes again.

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    1. Ann, there are a number of celebrities who grate on me and some who I dislike intensely for what they say and believe, but I'll still see their films, listen to their music, or whatever much of the time. I've enjoyed some of Woody Allen's films after hearing about his dalliance--actually he wasn't in the films so I didn't have to see him.

      I was more of a rock guy, but I tolerated disco music just fine. I even went to a few disco clubs, but overall that was not my scene.

      Lee

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  4. Bummer, I liked the Owl City version.
    I always find out who does a song and what the lyrics are first.

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    1. Alex, I do think lyrics matter. Most of the time I might not notice what the lyrics say, but if I find them overly offensive then that will affect whether or not I listen to it.

      Lee

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  5. I enjoyed disco when it was out. And even now there are some disco songs that still hold up in my estimation, but then others just seem too busy or cheesy. I like a very broad spectrum of music and songs and when I'm listening to my music, my opinion is the only one that matters, period.

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    1. Barbara, I like a lot of disco music for many reasons. Like you I like what I like.

      Lee

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  6. Hi, Lee! Some of my best friends are commies. Maybe that's why I've been blacklisted. :)

    I'm in the middle of a three year long series of posts saluting the Phil Spector sound. To my surprise I have encountered readers who choose to ignore his contributions to popular music and focus the discussion on his personality and recent legal problems.

    Disco is one of my guilty pleasures. It entered the mainstream around the time my first marriage was disintegrating and I spent a decade as a second time around bachelor dancing to it in clubs. I agree with hardcore rockers that a lot of disco records suck, but there are many genre recordings that have stood the test of time. One of the first disco records that turned me on was Gloria Gaynor's "Honey Bee."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohwftj6mMSw

    "Honey Bee" had soul and I bought the record. I skipped over Gloria's later recordings even though they became much bigger hits because they lacked soul, didn't have the same amount of street cred. There's a fine line between what pleases me and what annoys me.

    Thanks, Lee, and have a nice weekend!

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    1. Shady, it really doesn't make sense if an artist creates an excellent body of work and then does something bad later. How in the world can that possibly negate that previous work.. Now if the intent of the work was to promote evil or something which I disagreed with then I might not enjoy it from the outset, but even if I originally liked it at first there must have been a reason.

      I think that art should be judged apart from the artist. Now whether to support that artist through buying their work might be a different thing.

      Then there are the issues like the Roman Polanski situation. I like his films a lot and continue to enjoy them. I think there are a lot of questionable aspects to his "crime".

      Gosh, we could probably go through every artistic person's life and find things we didn't like and we probably wouldn't have anything left to enjoy.

      I still enjoy many tracks that emerged from the Disco era--Donna Sommer, Bee Gees, and so many more whose names I can't quite remember. And a lot of the music was just fun even though it was kind of stupid. It's entertainment.

      When I start exploring any creative work to any extent there's a greater chance that I will find more to like than dislike. That probably even applies to rap music if they'd just improve a lot of the lyrical content.

      Lee

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  7. you've been broached by the comment that has snippets of other's comments embedded in it. Malware of some sort Lee.

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    1. Yeah, Jan, I caught that one. Must have been a Chinese communist hacker. Or maybe Woody Allen.

      Lee

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  8. I did like disco when it first began, around 1975....remember Van McCoy's 'Hustle'? That was sort of the beginning of it. Always loved the BeeGees and I still defend Saturday Night Fever as a good movie b/c there actually was a storyline beyond the dancing. And say what you want about John Travolta, his solo dance to 'You Should be Dancin' in the movie was freakin incredible. That took strength and stamina of epic proportions, esp. for how many times he had to do it to rehearse and do the scene over and over. But by about 1979, I was weary of it and thought the disco quality had gone downhill. Was never a fan of Donna Summer, or Lipps Inc. or any of the bands from around that time. It was nice to see a shift away from disco in 1980, which was around the time I started hearing Life During Wartime.

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    1. JoJo, I agree with you about Travolta and Saturday Night Fever. I liked the film and the music. Like most popular music trends, disco ran its course of trendiness, but its influence remains. I still hear a lot of disco overtones in music today.

      Lee

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  9. LEE ~

    If you don't like my next song pick then you must be a commie or something.

    I don't like it, and I think a "commie" is the LAST thing anyone would accuse me of being.
    [:-)}

    Some have made the claim that the Disco Sucks movement had undertones of hate toward certain groups of society. Maybe that was true for some people.

    Yeah, maybe it was true for a tiny segment of the "Disco Sucks" movement, but it would have been such an insignificant number that it was a really dumb thing to say and had no real merit.

    It's the same sort of idiots who would say something like that who go around today saying that if you despise Barack Obama (and that is DEFINITELY ME!) then you're a racist. Because, you know, there are no reasons anyone might despise Obama beyond the fact that one of his parents was Black.

    The first person who ever uses that Obama/racist line on me, to my face, is probably going to wind up on the ground and bleeding profusely from the mouth. (Right after I inform them that I voted a Black man for president - BOTH of his parents having been Black - YEARS before THEY submitted a vote for Obama. Would that mean THEY had been racist because they hadn't voted for a Black president the first opportunity they'd had?)

    My vote for Johnny Lee doesn't even matter all that much.

    That surprised me, Lee! Was it just because his name was "Lee"? I would have bet a pretty penny your vote was going to Owl City.

    "This ain't no disco" from the Talking Heads song "Life During Wartime".

    Funny thing is, for some odd reason, I always thought that was The Who. Back then, the song 'WHO ARE YOU?' seemed kind of similar. Listening to '...Wartime' now, of course it's suddenly obvious that's David Byrne's vocals. (And, no, I didn't like 'Life During Wartime' any better back then just because I thought it was The Who and not Talking Heads.)

    My next song pick has been around for nearly 80 years ... I'll be featuring by a new wave prog rock band ... and a singer who was in his nineties when he made his own hit recording of this song...

    OK, I'm intrigued. I can't imagine my vote will go to the New Wave Prog-Rock band (are you sure they weren't Disco, too?) as I generally dislike both of those styles of music. But one never knows. Occasionally even my own BOTB votes surprise me. I ALWAYS listen with honest ears and vote my preference regardless of performer or the genre they are generally known for.

    Gosh, I hope the New Wave Prog-Rock band's competition isn't going to be John Jacob Niles. I can't stand that guy's singing!

    Do you enjoy disco music?

    Not much. I always LOVED 'Turn The Beat Around' by Vicki Sue Robinson. And I always liked 'On The Radio' by Donna Summer and 'Nights On Broadway' by the Bee Gees. 'Love's Theme', 'Rock The Boat' and 'A Fifth Of Beethoven' I liked too. That's about it for me and Disco.

    The purpose of Disco, of course, was primarily just something for people to dance to. Therefore, most of it was pretty banal and repetitive. Not what I would consider a true "art form" for the most part. If it had a really good sense of "fun", I could put up with it. But essentially, I thought Disco Sucked, and most of it still does, to my ears.

    I think that art should be judged apart from the artist. Now whether to support that artist through buying their work might be a different thing.

    I agree with that. If I like what was produced, I will admit to liking it regardless of the creator's character or habits. However, if I find that character or those habits TOO repugnant, I am not going to put my money in that person's purse or wallet regardless of the fact I enjoy some of what they produced.

    Lotta material for me to comment on in this post, Lee.

    ~ D-FensDogG
    'Loyal American Underground'

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    1. I would have bet a pretty penny your vote was going to Owl City.

      That version was okay, but it was way too wimpy and contrived. The Lee version was clever and well done.

      . I can't imagine my vote will go to the New Wave Prog-Rock band... But one never knows. Occasionally even my own BOTB votes surprise me.

      I think you'll probably vote for the 90 year old guy though I think the other artist will surprise you. They will probably be new to you as well.

      Disco... was primarily just something for people to dance to... most of it was pretty banal and repetitive.

      Isn't most music repetitive? That part of what makes it music. There might be variations in the presentation, but how can a song even be identified as a song without something to latch onto which are the repeated lines of melody and rhythm and choruses. As for banality, sure the lyrics often were, but not necessarily so for the melodies.

      I'm sure this debate could go on and on, but I appreciate the portion we got here. I'll be interested to hear your thoughts on what I present for the next BOTB post.

      Lee

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    2. >>... Isn't most music repetitive?

      LEE, c'mon, man! C'MON!

      OF COURSE there is repetition in music, and OF COURSE the repetition in the melody (and/or instrumentation) is a major part of what makes it music, and identifiable, and hummable, etc.

      But I am (OBVIOUSLY) talking about certain extreme degrees of repetition which can get old, Old, OLD and make a song unlistenable (to me, and many other folks, too).

      I alluded to something rather excessive that most people would immediately identify as a hallmark of the Disco sound in general, and you try to call it into question by ignoring the extreme nature of it and point out that almost all music has a repetitive quality to it?

      Brother, you know perfectly well that I could provide links here to famous Disco songs where the repetition is extreme (and part of what made Disco, Disco). And I could contrast them with famous non-Disco songs where the repetition is highly recognizable but hardly to the point where it becomes rather monotonous.

      I'm not gonna waste time doing that because you already know I could. You know what I'm yakking about here, but I guess you just needed to find something to disagree about.

      ~ D-FensDogG

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    3. But as you said the purpose of disco music is to provide a repetitious beat for people to dance to. However if one is not dancing the repetitious beat could have other purposes such as inducing a trance-like state or helping some to focus mentally, antithetical in a sense but it depends on the listener. Many people use disco music for aerobic exercise or running because of the beat which is akin to a fast heartbeat.

      I guarantee you that there are many people who would consider a Dylan song, a long jazz piece, or even certain classical musical to be monotonous and repetitious. Of course it all comes down to preference in musical style.

      Lee

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    4. *Sniff!-Sniff!*

      LEE, either your blog is on fire or someone's blowin' smoke!

      This is a pointless discussion, so this'll be my last post in this comment section.

      My original point, which everyone knows is true (yourself included) was that Disco music was primarily meant as music to dance to, thus it was generally rather banal and repetitive. That's IT! You had asked "Do you enjoy disco music?" I made the mistake of answering the question and giving you the reason why I did not care for most Disco music.

      You managed to find a way to make it a controversial statement and somehow managed to introduce all kinds of unrelated concepts such as music for "inducing trance-like states, helping to focus mentally, and aerobic exercise".

      Fun Fact: What you said about "long jazz pieces, or even certain classical music" was only 180-degrees off from my view.

      The truth is that most people whose ears are not accustomed to long Jazz pieces would find most of them seeming to be kind of randomly composed without a lot of clearly defined, unifying musical themes (such as melodic repetition, etc.)

      Although I don't know much about Classical music, after 55 years of hearing it here, there, and just about everywhere, I would say that - to my ears - the vast majority of full Classical compositions, with their various movements and complex musical ideas, are not generally thought of as "excessively repetitious" in the least. The average Disco song, however, IS.

      I remember a time when you didn't always look for something to disagree with me about, "Mr. Contrarian".

      ~ D-FensDogG

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    5. STMcC, I was just elaborating and making some additional points of discussion. And I think I stayed pretty well on the point. Have you ever listened to some of those aerobics tapes. Disco makes for good exercise.

      I would definitely agree that disco as well as most forms of pop music are very repetitious and I think that's the point that makes the music popular. A lot of people love that kind of stuff because they don't really have to think about it. The music like disco is the expression of feelings without any rational thought process involved. We see a lot of that in our modern society.

      I don't purposely look for something to disagree with you about in order to rile you or anything, but to fine tune the discussion because I like taking to you.

      Lee

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  10. Well, StMc gave you extensive comment.

    I'm worn out just reading it. In fact, I think I hear a sandwich calling my name.

    Not surprised by the Johnny Lee win on this one. AND, I'm looking forward to whatever you have in store for your next battle. I suppose if I don't like it I should just keep my trap shut. I don't wanna be labeled no commie. ;)

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    1. Robin, I fully expected Johnny Lee's version to win. As for my "commie" reference I'm sure it will become more clear when the music is put into context with my associated topic for that day.

      Lee

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  11. Some have made the claim that the Disco Sucks movement had undertones of hate toward certain groups of society

    That is not true.

    As chairman of the Philadelphia Chapter, I can tell you with certainty that there were no "undertones"

    The movement expressed hatred towards those who played disco.

    It is funny, that as much as I loathed disco back in high school, some of it is now pretty cool to my ears (nostalgia, I am sure).

    Larry

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    1. Larry, I like disco better now than I used to, but as you say there is probably the nostalgia factor in addition to the fact that I've become attuned to listening to it.

      Lee

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    2. Hey, since Larry already used the quote I was planning on, I'll just throw in here. I never sensed that in any of my group that hated disco. Rather, we just got sick of music that seemed pre-packaged and artificial. Do you think Come On Eileen and My Sharona would have been as big of hits had they not been a breath of fresh air against all the "Bad Girls", "Hot Stuff", Le Freak", and "Ring My Bell" out there?

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    3. CW, "Come On Eileen" was kind of a cool song and the repeated MTV plays didn't hurt. It was kind of different though. As for "My Sharona", well it was just one of those quirky novelties that come along that are kind of compelling for a while. Besides without that song we would never have had Weird Al's "My Bologna" and maybe not even Weird Al as a music phenomena.

      Lee

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  12. I read Ender's Game before I knew anything about Orson Scott Card. It's a good book. The fact that he's not a very good person doesn't make it not a good book.
    Those kinds of conflicts are inevitable, I suppose, but I try to always evaluate the art apart from the artist.

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    1. Andrew, I agree. If I know something very bad about someone or there is an extreme point of disagreement between my beliefs and theirs, then I might not read, listen to, or watch something if I was previously unfamiliar with their body of work. But if I've already found reason to like something and recognize merit in it, I can't change that though I might reevaluate based on what I eventually found out.

      Lee

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    2. Sheboyganboy SixJune 8, 2015 at 1:21 AM

      Why do you claim he is "not a very good person"? All I can think of is that you must not like Mormonism, or perhaps the political conclusions that generally follow from Mormon premises, such as an opposition to homosexuality.

      If that is all it is there are certainly WAY more objectionable authors with more success than Card!

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  13. I just flashed on my parents practicing their moves to "More Than A Woman" before the Marine Corps Ball. Man...good times. :)

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    1. Raquel, I agree there were good times and sometimes that's all we need to appreciate music no matter how bad it might be generally considered to be now. I'd say in general there are more positive feelings about disco now that there even was when disco was popular.

      Lee

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  14. I wasn't a big fan of disco. The lyrics have to speak to me. It's more about what a song is saying than it is about the music. To me anyway!

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    1. Paula, and I'm the other way around. I often don't pay any attention to lyrics until I've heard the song a number of times and even then I might not notice them. I go for the over all effect of the song production and performance.

      Lee

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  15. I'm old enough to remember the "Disco Sucks" thing. Artists were pissed that Disco music was doing so well, and they concluded that that type of music didn't require any brains. It reminds me of when authors get mad that some popular books that appeal to the masses do better than "literary" books. ~~~ Here's the thing, the public will decide what they want and what they don't want. If you can't handle that, then don't produce music or writing for the public. ~~~ I think during that time I wore a counter t-shirt that said "Rock Sucks," in fact, I think many of us did. (Although, I actually do like Rock.) ~~~ I can't stand music snobs and I can't stand writing snobs. ( I like ALL types of music. That's part of what makes me interesting and not boring.)

    ~~~~

    Precious Monsters

    Sign up for the Paranormal Romance Blog Hop for July 14, 2015

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    1. Jolie, Hear, hear! I like your line of thinking as I'm the same way. It's always easier to just outright criticize things than to seek out the merits and discover reasons why one might learn to like something even though it might not have seemed interesting at first.

      Lee

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  16. I actually like disco, as I have a couple of albums by Donna Summers (including the long version of "Love To Love You Baby") and KC & The Sunshine Band.

    In spite of the repetitiveness/cliché lyrics of some of the songs, disco really had some good beats/hooks to them.

    Not sure what songs you might pick, but judging from the open lyric snippet from the T-Heads "Life During Wartime" and the disco oriented question, perhaps something from the new wave era of the late 70's/early 80's?

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    1. GB, Disco is nothing deep, but I think it was always intended to be fun unlike some of the late 60's and 70's music that became all involved in issues and serious stuff.

      The song versions I've chosen for the next round come from 1988 and 2001, but like mentioned the song is one that's been around for quite some time.

      Lee

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  17. No, I definitely do NOT like disco nor the Miami beat which has that same sound, repetitive, fast and meant primarily for dancing. I liked the songs from Grease better than from Saturday Night Fever. . .

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    1. DG, Grease was a fun movie and had some enjoyable music. I guess I'm pretty easy to please.

      Lee

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  18. I really know nothing about disco other than I enjoy watching dancers dance to it on shows like "So You Think You Can Dance." They get up to some pretty interesting flips and lifts.
    Brandy from Brandy's Bustlings

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    1. Brandy, they are pretty talented. I don't think I can dance.

      Lee

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  19. You have me intrigued as to what your next battle is going to be. I know I've got something fun planned for mine. I remember Disco Duck and some of the other disco songs.. I'm surprised by all the hate out there - after all those hours of dancing the music provided.

    Mary
    www.jinglejanglejungle.net

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    1. Mary, I didn't do much dancing to the music, but I can't say I hate it. There is not much music that I could say I hate.

      Lee

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  20. It was a good song, by both artists.

    I listen to all kinds of music too. But if I liked a song and found out Adolf Hitler wrote it, I'd probably not like it any more because I'd wonder what the motivation behind the song was. I liked songs before, discovered the "true meaning" and decided not to like it anymore. Ideas get stuck in my head like that sometimes, and I can't go back to my own interpretation.

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    1. Dolorah, the Hitler example was a bit extreme, but I'm just saying that something seemed utterly out of context with someone, could there be a goodness to that creation that reflected a goodness within even the worst person. But I understand what you're saying too and my human nature would probably lead me to the same conclusion as you.

      Lee

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  21. There is another way . . . . . .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U13xOvDa19U

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    1. Rob, Thanks--this is great. I think I may have another BOTB post for the future. Like I needed more!

      Lee

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  22. I try NOT to learn about musicians/actors whose work I enjoy because I'm afraid I'll find out something unsavory and be turned away. Maybe it's too much "willful ignorance" but I make every attempt to judge a creative endeavor without my beliefs intruding. It doesn't always end that way, though, and it ends up tainted.

    And, I remember reading about the movement you're referring to, but I think it went further than that. Then again, I'm very choosy about the rap music I listen to and I'm far from racist, I just think life is more than drugs, violence, and private parts.

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    1. Jennifer, I'm kind of with you on this. Sometimes we can't help but learn certain things about creative people especially now when they're often in the news showing who they are and what they represent.

      I try to go for the suspension of disbelief method and just enjoy the work without thinking of the artist unless the artist is trying to influence us through the work. Then I'm probably turned off by it anyway--well unless it's promoting something I agree with.

      Lee

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  23. Hahaha! I had one of those "Disco Sucks" T-shirts, but, we still had a great time dancing the night away, every weekend. ☺ KC and the Sunshine Band and their ilk (i.e.hardcore Disco) kind of made me gag, but I liked a few of the Bee Gees' and Donna Summer's songs. Even Rod Stewart and The Stones got on the Disco bandwagon. Those were good. My opinion of any musical (or other artistic) work is based solely on my enjoyment thereof. Whether or not the artist is an exemplary human being or holds different beliefs matters not.

    I'm not surprised Johnny Lee won this battle.
    You've certainly peaked my curiosity about the next one!

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    1. Debbie, plenty of people got on that disco bandwagon and the sound continues to influence music today. Actually I like KC and the Sunshine Band quite well. I thought they did some cool songs with interesting melodic lines.

      Johnny Lee had a much more solid performance so his win knowing the tastes of many of my readers did not surprise me.

      I think you and others will find my next match up rather interesting.

      Lee

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    2. Your BOTB posts are always interesting! As for Disco, let's just say I enjoyed the social life surrounding it and some of the music; the rest I tolerated because it was part and parcel of that whole era. Some of the songs were fun. ☺ ♫ Rah Rah Rasputin, lover of the Russian queen. ♫

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    3. That Rasputin song is totally new to me! I knew the songs that I heard On The Radio but didn't go too much further than that. I probably went to more country and western music clubs a la Urban Cowboy than anything else, but really I wasn't much of a club hopper back then--or ever for that matter.

      Lee

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    4. Rasputin was a European disco song, also popular in Canada. Not sure how well it fared in the U.S., but I always liked that one. ☺
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvDMlk3kSYg
      We were total "party animals" back then. Inspiration for another memoir!
      Country Western bars must have been fun too. We don't have many of those around here, but I remember Urban Cowboy well. Good movie.

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    5. Oops! I guess copy/paste links don't work on Blogger?
      Try this: Rasputin

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    6. That's okay since I had already googled it and listened. Don't remember ever hearing this song before.

      I need to see Urban Cowboy again. When I saw it in the theater I was with my first wife who looked a lot like Debra Winger and acted like her. Some of the scenes made me feel really jealous and upset and now I don't even recall how the movie ended. I just know I was being stupid and got mad about a dumb movie. Now I don't guess the movie would bother me like that since my first wife and I have been apart for like 35 years. Water under the bridge. And I'm a little less dumb now I guess.

      Lee

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    7. That's an interesting reaction to a movie. ☺ I'd like to see it again too; haven't since it came out. I'm sure it will seem really dated. We're all smarter in our "old age", yes? At least, I hope so! Have a good week.

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  24. Ah yes, Disco Sucks Disco Demolition. Good ol' Steve Dahl. The worst promotion in MLB history, yet one of the most enjoyable to remember. No, I don't hate disco, but this fiasco was hilarious as a result of the aftermath. Thanks for memories.

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    1. Jeffrey, I was on the road probably somewhere out west when that event happened. I don't recall hearing about it at the time, but I did hear about it later. You never know what's going to work, but I guess this secured Dahl's place in pop history.

      Lee

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Go ahead and say something. Don't be afraid to speak your mind.
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Lee