The Manhattan Project--2016 A to Z Theme

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Sunday, February 1, 2015

Bye Bye Love (BOTB)



         The first of February on this blog means it's time for another Battle of the Bands, the blogging event first introduced by our friends at Far Away Series and  StMcC Presents Battle of the Bands.   This event happens twice each month on the 1st and 15th.   The premise is simple:  Listen to the songs presented below and then in the comments vote for your favorite and tell us why you liked it.  Then visit the links listed near the bottom of this post for more Battle action.

          Having just celebrated my birthday this past Friday has me in a celebratory mood to honor a birthday of a notable figure of rock music history.  Don Everly was born on February 1st in 1937.  He and his brother Phil comprised the Everly Brothers who had a career that spanned nearly 50 years with a string of hits that eventually landed them a place in both the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Country Music Hall of Fame--no small achievement.  Many major artists including the Beatles, Paul Simon, and Neil Young have named them as an influence.

         The Everly Brothers will long be remembered for their music.   Happy birthday Don Everly.

"Bye Bye Love"

          "Bye Bye Love" (1957) was the debut of the Everlys and became a million seller hit record for the duo kicking off their stellar career.  The song was written by Felice and Boudleaux Bryant, a husband and wife songwriting team who have composed many well-known songs including "Rocky Top", "Love Hurts", and "Wake Up, Little Susie". Since the Everlys' initial success with "Bye Bye Love", the song has been recorded by numerous artists over the years and used in several movies, television shows, and commercials.  

          In this edition of Battle of the Bands I will once again be closing with a 3rd entry that is a somewhat long movie clip.  You can choose to disregard this final clip if you don't want to spend the time watching it--and let me add here that this is an outstanding version of the song with a great visual production.  As in my previous Battle of the Bands I'm going to announce my pick ahead of time and my pick will be the long movie version at the end of the post.   But if you prefer you can choose between the two shorter versions that I'm offering first.  I think they're both very good.   I'm not including the original version by the Everly Brothers since that might give an unfair advantage.

        Let's get started!  (If you want to hear the version by the Everly Brothers you can click on this link, but please don't vote on that version)

Ray Charles "Bye Bye Love" (1962)

       From his album Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music, Ray Charles jazzes up the Everly Brothers' hit with a big band flair.   This is a short one that flies by, but it's classic Ray Charles style.  Enjoy.




Madeleine Peyroux "Bye Bye Love" (2013)

         Jazz singer Madeleine Peyroux gives the song a bit of a New Orleans voodoo twist giving it a cool groove.  This is from Peyroux's album The Blue Room.




Ben Vereen and Roy Scheider "Bye Bye Life" (1979)

        The film All That Jazz is based on the life story of Bob Fosse who also co-wrote, directed, and choreographed the movie.  The film was nominated for 9 Oscars in 1980, winning in four categories and it won numerous other entertainment awards as well.  This highly acclaimed film starred Roy Scheider in the lead role.  You might remember Scheider as the police chief in the movie Jaws--he's the one who says "You're gonna need a bigger boat".   Scheider appeared in numerous roles in a film career that spanned nearly fifty years and garnered him two Academy Award nominations as well as several other awards.

********* (Spoiler alert! -- though it's probably not a big deal in regard to the film musical All That Jazz)******
****************************************************************



       In the final death scene musical production, the song "Bye Bye Love" gets some lyric changes that turns the song into "Bye Bye Life".  In my opinion this is the best rendition of the Everly Brothers' hit ever recorded--this really rocks!  I cast my vote for this version.   Since this runs for nearly ten minutes you might choose not to watch and just vote between the two shorter versions offered above.  I think you will be well rewarded if you do watch the clip below.

       If you never have seen the film and enjoy musical films about show business, dancing, and pushing life beyond the limit, I highly recommend All That Jazz.   It's one great film.

Warning:  There is brief nudity in this clip.  






Time to Vote!

          Which do you prefer?  I've started off the voting with one vote for the version of "Bye Bye Life" from the film All That Jazz which as I said earlier is an optional choice in this contest.   I hope you will consider this one, but I'll understand if you only choose between the shorter versions.  

        Now it's up to you to determine the winner.   Please vote on your favorite by letting us know your choice in the comment section and tell us why you prefer the one you chose.  Then after you've finished here, please visit the other blogs listed below who may or may not be participating this time around.   And if you've put up your own BOTB contest let us know that as well so we can vote on yours.

Here are some other places where you might find BOTB posts:

FAR AWAY SERIES’ 

 StMcC Presents Battle of the Bands

 ‘YOUR DAILY DOSE’ 

  'MIKE'S RAMBLINGS'

DC Relief Battle of the Bands

        The results of my Battle will be announced on this coming Friday February 6th.   No post this Monday since I've posted this and want to give this post more of a chance to allow for voting.  On Wednesday I'll have my post for the Insecure Writer's Support Group.

             Have you seen All That Jazz?   What do you think was Roy Scheider's best role of his film career?     Are you an Everly Brothers fan?    



67 comments:

  1. All That Jazz was out there, wasn't it?
    Oddly enough, that version would be my first choice.

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    1. I should think you would appreciate that musically. Some fine playing in that one with hot rock guitar.

      Lee

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  2. I'm not a fan of jazz....I like the swing era type jazz but overall, not a genre I cared for. Of course I liked Roy in the Jaws franchise. I will vote for Ray Charles' version.

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  3. Hi Lee. I wasn't much of a Ray Charles fan, though I liked the band swing here. Peyroux's voice doesn't do it fo me.(smile)
    Interesting battle - sumpin' for everyone, I suppose! That said...
    I remember the first time I saw "All That Jazz," I wondered if the Everly brothers were still around. I didn't want them to miss this. What a wild tribute! (and send off for the character) > That's my vote.

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    1. The Everly Brothers were around when All That Jazz came out, but I never thought about what their reaction might have been. Even more so I wonder what the reaction of the songwriters might have been to the take on their song. I can't help but think that any of them would have been pleased and impressed by the incredible performances and the creative arrangement of the movie version of this song.

      Lee

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  4. I'm voting for the one I'm the most familiar with and the one I enjoyed the most by the Everly Brothers.

    betty

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    1. And that's why I didn't include the Everly Brothers in this contest so this is a no vote for any of the contestants unless you want to come back to vote of one of the three. Familiarity does not always mean better.

      Lee

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  5. Since I stayed away from Jaws, I vote for All That Jazz. As far as the song goes, I do love both the Everly Brothers and Ray Charles, so it's a tie.

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    1. Well, that's kind of an ambiguous vote. I guess I'll count that for Ray Charles though that might not totally be fair.

      Lee

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  6. I like both, but I'm voting for the bluesy sound of Madeleine Peyroux.

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  7. You know...my hubby says "a plane could crash in front of you and you wouldn't notice":) Love the song choice! All That Jazz is in my top 10 films to see. It's actually in the "I can't believe I still have not seen this film yet" list. If I was going by the sheer Fosse spectacle the last clip would win hands down. It is an amazing piece like so much of Fosse's work. He knew, with all his smoking, heart attacks and other vices that he would not live long and this is a great epitaph but if I closed my eyes and just listened to the song, it would not be my first choice despite it being great. I am going with the Ray Charles version. It is a version I can listen to again and again and not be bored but would start to dance to. The 2nd version was OK but mellow, over a glass of wine. The 3rd is a true experience that must be savoured and taken in with the film. So Ray Charles it is..I surprise myself

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    1. If you like Fosse's work then All That Jazz is a must see film for you. It is the epitome of modern performance art and a message to all who are pushing life to the limit.

      Lee

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  8. Wow, those are ALL such interesting versions. While at first glance I figured I'd like Ray Charles' version best, I really, really, really liked the Scheider/Vereen update for All That Jazz. Not quite enough to give it my vote, though. My vote is actually going to Peyroux, whom I've never heard of before. I loved her rich vocals, and you're right...it does have sort of a "voodoo" groove, and that's what won me over.

    I didn't see my blog updated in STMcC's blogroll yet, but my BOTB is up as well :)

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    1. I have to get back over to your site. Your post wasn't up yet when I stopped by earlier. Peyroux was new to me as well, but I do like her style.

      Lee

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  9. Well, I don't know if I can give anything but a non-vote. Y'see, I grew up with the Everly's and it would take a mighty song to knock them off the pedestal. None of the three choices came close to doing that for me. The styles on the jazz job and the film clip weren't close to mine (with the film clip about as far away from it as I'd care to wander), and Ray's sounds like most other Ray songs. But that isn't all that bad, so I guess I'll vote for him, given the rules.

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    1. A half-hearted vote for Ray Charles then it is.

      Lee

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  10. Excellent BATTLE Mr. Bird. Three very distinct choices.

    If I could I would vote for Phil and Don. In my way of thinking...they own this one. But...I'll play by the rules.

    Ray's version was just so...Ray. Not really bad, and I did not dislike it, but it just didn't do it for me.

    I was excited to listen to Miss Peyroux (of whom I had never heard), expecting some lazy New Orleans type jazz. Her version was not necessarily bad, but I was disappointed that it wasn't more...I don't know...New Orleans jazz.

    The musical spectacle of 'All that Jazz' didn't fail to disappoint. The play on the lyrics was clever and appropriate (given the storyline). What's not to like about Ben Vereen and Roy Scheider definitely 'needed a bigger boat' to take home the applause and accolades from this performance. As a side note - my last BATTLE (you know the 'failed' one - 'There'll be Some Changes Made' was also a tune, slightly twisted for use in 'All that Jazz'.

    Anyway...give my vote to the musical spectacle of one man's life and death, or dying. I guess something good can come from excess.

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    1. All That Jazz has a lot of great numbers that can be pitted in Battle. Got you down for what I think was really the right choice of any version of this song. The movie version is pretty darn epic and amazing in my book.

      Great movie too!

      Lee

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  11. I watched all three. It surprises me that I've never seen All That Jazz. I love music. I love dancing. Not sure where the disconnect happened... maybe because it came out in 1980. I was 12. My parents wouldn't have approved I don't think. And then I just forgot about it. Until now. I appreciate the musicality and creativity of the number. Since I didn't watch the movie before I almost feel like I skipped to the end of the book with it, but no matter. It was a BIG number and visually arresting, but not my favorite.

    I liked the previously unknown Ms. Peyroux the best. I enjoyed her arrangement (and it's very different from the Everly Brothers). I find that I like slower songs more and more. Not sure what's up with that, but there it is.

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    1. Nothing wrong with the Peyroux version. I was pleasantly surprised to discover it. And, yes, I'm starting to like slower songs more and more, though I've always had a preference for the slower songs.

      You really must see All That Jazz! It's a pretty amazing film. One of the best about dancing and show biz and hard living.

      Lee

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  12. I am babysitting my 4 year old grandson today and he is helping me vote. I liked both, kinda liked Madeline a tad better - words like groovy man cam to mind. But Cory (the grandchild) says he liked Ray better, and I could not change his mind.

    So Ray gets the vote. Unless Cory gets one for Ray, and I get one for Mady.

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    1. The votes would cancel each other out, but I can give one to each.

      Lee

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  13. Well, first of all, the Everly Brothers original is definitely the best.

    But of the three versions offered here for voting purposes, I am casting a somewhat half-hearted vote for Madeleine Peyroux. It was pretty good but I think it could have been even better.

    I loved the instrumentation and background singing in the Ray Charles version, but like the version from 'ALL THAT JAZZ', the tempo and tone of it was ridiculously at odds with the actual sentiment of the lyrics. Both of them seemed to be raucously celebrating the loss of love (and life) and happiness. HELLO-OOO! Did any of these people even take the lyrics into consideration when arranging the songs? Apparently not.

    I mean, the sentiment of this song is not conducive to sing-alongs and rocking out.

    ~ D-FensDogg
    'Loyal American Underground'

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    1. Within the context of the movie All That Jazz the arrangement makes all the sense in the world--it's what this great film is about. The folks behind the movie totally took the concepts into consideration and I think if you actually watch the clip without seeing the film you can catch that. The gist of the story is based on the real life of the film's director who essentially lived his life as shown in the film and eventually died as he predicted in the film--suicide by excess in life. It's a great film that you might want to check out, but I think that you tend not to like most of the films I like.

      So bottom line the tempo and tone are not "ridiculously at odds with the actual sentiment of the lyrics" but totally in keeping with how the story conveys the lyrics.

      Personally I think the film version of the song blows away all other versions of the song that I've heard, but of course that's only my opinion.

      I do encourage you to see All That Jazz to see what you think. The award nominations were well deserved and I'm not a lone voice in the wilderness lauding the praises for this film. Roy Scheider does a fantastic job in the role.

      Lee

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    2. I tried watching 'ALL THAT JAZZ' once. It was a long time ago and I think I made it maybe one hour or one hour and twenty minutes into it before turning it off and cutting my losses.

      You're right, Lee, we don't agree much on movies. And if you add up our BOTB votes, it seems we don't agree much on music either.

      But yer still muh pal.

      ~ D-FensDogg
      'Loyal American Underground'

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    3. My guess is that I probably agree more with you than you agree with me, but you're in a large crowd. I have a lot of tastes and interests that a lot of people just don't get or are willingly to take the time to learn to appreciate. On the other hand, you wouldn't have found me wasting my time watching something like the Super Bowl which it seemed that 99% of America was enthralled with for weeks and I just didn't get the interest in that. Though I did happen to tune in to catch the end of the Half-time Show which I thought was an interesting extravaganza and somewhat entertaining. Then I turned the tube off when that was over.

      The agreement (or disagreement) between me and you and tons of others I'm sure is rooted in deep-seated background issues that I've explored in previous posts and never came to any real clear conclusion and probably never could since the reasons are as vast as the number of people in the world now or throughout history. Nevertheless I will probably continue to be perplexed when I find something to be wonderful and others will hate it. Just like rap music fans might be stunned if I don't think their gangsta stuff is great, except they might decide to kill me for not liking what I see as typically sub-par attempts at creating music.

      Anyway so be it. Such is the mystery of the melting pot of humanity.

      Lee

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  14. You've presented another interesting battle, avoiding the obvious blowout winner as a choice, and instead offering up three very different versions.

    None really really ring my chimes. I really disliked the Peyroux version, so she does not get the vote. The All That Jazz version is quite interesting... but frankly, I didn't like the arrangement OR the voices.

    So, by default, I'll vote for Ray Charles. I like him, I like his voice, though I am honestly not too keep on the arrangement.

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  15. It would have been a rather pointless Battle to have included the Everly Brothers version. Part of the attraction of the Battles is to present new, different, and unique takes on a song. If you put the obvious pick for most people there is little point of having the contest. Even in this Battle there have been some visitors who just named the Everly's and in all probability they didn't even bother to listen to the other picks.

    Maybe if one has seen All That Jazz that version becomes more appealing. I used to have the soundtrack cassette and played the heck out of it. The intricacies of that arrangement of "Bye Bye Life" blow me away. It's a tour-de-force like a piece of classical music--it's a grand stage piece of music and I think the musicianship is outstanding. Love the percussive effects of the drums and hand claps. The guitar rocks. The ending is a little long, but it's in character with the exposition necessary to the story.

    I'm surprised about some of the negativity shown to this piece, but as always it comes down to musical preferences. And I'm sure a lot of it is a matter of context. If you watched the film you might have have different impression. Then again you might hate the film. For me the film and the song production in this clip are masterpieces of cinematic and musical art.

    But I duly record your vote for Ray Charles. And I said "duly" and not "dully".

    Arlee Bird
    A to Z Challenge Co-host
    Tossing It Out

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  16. It's been ages since I've seen All That Jazz, and I'm glad you reminded me of what a wonderful movie it was. It focused on Bob Fosse's creative genius as a choreographer, as well as the flaws in his personal life. This was so against type for Roy Scheider, yet he gave a brilliant performance. I love what he and Ben Vereen did with Bye Bye Life. This was the perfect final curtain! Thanks Lee!

    Julie

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    1. I wouldn't have expected this performance from Scheider. It's so cool when you get to see another side of an artist whom you've gotten used to seeing in a different light..

      I'm glad you've reaffirmed the high quality of this film.

      Lee

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  17. I was not sure how this would play out. Pitting three bands against a favorite Everly Brothers tune is really tricky But, you did well, my friend. I listened to only a few seconds of Ray Charles' cover and dismissed it as a no, then I went on to the next. Once Madelina got past the intro singing all the bye-bye love in an annoying high pitch tone, her voice wasn't bad to listen to, but for cover was too slow to suit my taste. I was totally surprised to find that I actually enjoyed the third cut best. Who knew Roy Scheider could sing? Not me! Ben Vereen was a bit silly, but I know he can sing and dance. I really liked watching him dance when I was younger. So, you can give your 10-min movie clip version from All That Jazz another vote from me! BTW, I have not seen the movie. I may have to check into it now.

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    1. By all means check out this great film if you appreciate musicals. To clarify Ben Vereen's silliness in the clip, he was doing a parody of sorts that echoed something that was heard earlier in the film--I believe it was something on television they were watching of something of that nature. In any case, Ben Vereen was supposed to come across as silly in this segment.

      Thanks for the vote!

      Lee

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  18. As much as I love Ray Charles music, I'm going with Madeleine Peyroux. I guess the Everly Brothers influenced this choice because it seems this song needs harmony...at least to my ear.

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    1. The Everly Brothers' harmonies are what inspired so many artists who were influenced by the duo.

      Lee

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  19. Ray won me over, though I didn't think that would be the case since I didn't care for his back-up singers.

    I have never seen All That Jazz before. Possibly, if I had, it would connect with me.

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    1. All That Jazz is a fine movie by me, but it might not resonate with everyone.

      Lee

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  20. Peyroux just didn't do it for me. I think I fell asleep during hers. And while All That Jazz was interesting, it just didn't quite have the shine of the Ray Charles version. I vote for Ray.

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    1. Maybe you were just tired. I'm about to fall asleep now and I'm not listening to any song.

      Lee

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  21. Got to give it to Ray Charles on this one. :)

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  22. While that jazz one was good, I like Ray Charles' better.

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  23. While I am a huge Ray Charles fan, I'll give this one to Madeleine Peyroux. Sitting back in my lounge chair with a glass of fine wine .... oh yes, Madeleine wins.

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    1. Yeah, I can get grooving with the wine glass and easy chair to the sounds of the Big Easy.

      Lee

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  24. I cast a vote, but it hasn't showed up. Maybe it will later. Anyway, the vote was for Madeleine Peyroux, because Ray's was too short and the "All That Jazz" version was way too long, plus I like the arrangement.

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    1. Madeleine still has a foothold in this contest.

      Lee

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  25. Interesting battle, Lee!

    I liked the original, but it would not win my vote in this battle. I think there's clearly one winner here, by a wide margin, even against the original Everly Brothers version.

    Ray's was good, but felt like kind of a throw-away piece, perhaps to fill up an album.

    Madeleine Peyroux I liked, especially the music. But I found the vocals not quite as good as I expected for some reason.

    Here's two things I've enjoyed watching in my life: The Super Bowl each and every year AND Bob Fosse's "All That Jazz" It's one of my all-time favorite movies, and I've seen it a ton of times. I think it's also probably Roy Schneider's bet film. The choreography, direction, and story is excellent. The film's version of "Bye Bye Love (Life)" with Ben Vereen is also phenomenal. I think the creative way it adds all the variety of parts and moods is wonderful.

    All That Jazz for me by a wide margin. "It's showtime!"

    But I still like the Super Bowl and thought yesterday's game was one of the better ones, even with two teams that I don't care for, and one I consistently root against (Dang Patriots!)


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    1. Ah, a man with fine discriminating tastes!

      Thank you for backing me up on the greatness of this film. You and I agree on all aspects of this great rendition of "Bye Bye Love" and I agree that it outshines the version by the great Everly Brothers though their version is classic no doubt.

      Lee

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  26. Bye Bye Life!!! All that Jazz is one of my all time favourite movies and I'm so glad you included this here. Whenever I hear Bye Bye Love, I always think of All That Jazz and most people I know have never seen it. Thanks Lee! It was worth the price of admission just to hear that again!

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    1. Now we're rolling with some All That Jazz fans. It is such a great film!

      Lee

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  27. Ray Charles for me! He has a fast hook that kept me listening. The others took too much of a warm-up.

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    1. You like to just get down to business then. Ray for you.

      Lee

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  28. I still know the original Everl Brothers Bye Bye Love, hello loniless, I think I'm going to cry. Way before my time, but I'm a big Everly Borthers fan.

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    1. The Everly version is so iconic that I can't imagine that there are many people in the U.S. at least who haven't heard it.

      Lee

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  29. I am voting for Madeleine Peyroux "Bye Bye Love" (2013). That's the one that I would play on repeat for a couple of hours so it was my choice.

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    1. I could listen to that version a lot too.

      Lee

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  30. I cast my vote for the original. The harmony is amazing...
    Generally speaking, I'm not at all a fan of musicals. However, I thought All That Jazz was excellent. Probably because it was very dark...

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    1. Since the original by the Everly Brothers is not part of the vote then I guess I'll cast your vote to the All That Jazz version by default. I guess that's fair.

      Lee

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  31. Hi Lee!
    If you still can, cast my vote for the Madeleine Peyroux version.
    Thanks!

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  32. >>... My guess is that I probably agree more with you than you agree with me

    Ha!-Ha! That was funny, Brother Boidman. (I assume you meant it to be funny.)

    Nah, Boidman, ya got it all wrong. All the (rare) times that you and I agree on music and movies, it is ME agreeing with you. Not YOU agreeing with me.

    Classic! Loved it!

    Hey, Q: Are you gonna find a way to work your BOTBs into your April A To Z posts?

    ~ D-FensDogg
    'Loyal American Underground'

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    1. By all means I will be doing the BOTB posts in April. In fact that was the first thing I set up. Like I did last year I'm going to tie in the song with the topic of the day.

      I think it works out pretty nicely. In fact on the first day of A to Z I'll be doing a combined BOTB, IWSG, and Ask Arlee post where everything ties together very logically.

      Lee

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    2. GREAT! I'm sincerely glad to know that. I would hate to see you leave BOTB for any reason. I think you have done more than anyone to promote BOTB and the growth we've seen in participation is due mainly (if not exclusively) to you.

      OK, Brother Boid, I'll see ya then.

      ~ D-FensDogg

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Go ahead and say something. Don't be afraid to speak your mind.
I normally try to respond to all comments in the comment section so please remember to check the "Email follow-up comments" box if you want to participate in the comment conversation.

For Battle of the Bands voting the "Anonymous" commenting option has been made available though this version is the least preferred. If voting using "anonymous" please include in your comment your name (first only is okay) and city you are voting from and the reason you chose the artist you did.

If you know me and want to comment but don't want to do it here, then you can send me an email @ jacksonlee51 at aol dot com.

Lee