The Manhattan Project--2016 A to Z Theme

Always a work in progress--welcome to my blog...

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Ask Arlee: Quality Content VS. Frequent Posting?



And now another episode of Ask Arlee...

M. J. Joachim asks...
Quality content vs. frequent posting? Obviously, it takes way too much time to do both!

       Does it?  Can we post with frequency and still have quality posts?   I see many blogs that I would judge to be accomplishing this, but the answer to this question might be a matter of opinion.  Let's try to define what each of these aspects of blogging actually means.

Quality Content

        "Content is king" is the well-known adage attributed to Bill Gates back in 1996.  However, does this really apply that much to all of us as bloggers?  For the most part the saying is more applicable to search engine accessibility based on originality of content.  Our content should be original and it should have good quality.  But "quality" can be a variable and rather selective term.

         We need to determine the purpose behind our blogging.  If we are striving to be pro bloggers with blogs that readers regularly follow or search engine researchers arrive at for specific information, the blog posts need to be of a unique informational content that is professional and authoritative.  This is the type of blog with quality content that is backed by good research and experience in a field and is suitable for quoting from or citing elsewhere as coming from a reliable source.

         If you are not a pro blogger who fits the above description then I think you can still maintain quality content but that quality would be of a different nature.  There is that level of quality that we would expect from any published work--proper grammar, correct spelling, engaging presentation, and so on.  If you are blogging to establish platform then your blog should be exemplary of what you are delivering or plan to deliver to your audience in your published work.

          Comments can tell us a lot.  If a blogger is doing all the right social networking and receives few comments or the very shallow "nice post" comments I think there is something wrong with the content.   I'd rather have four high caliber comments that tell me that the readers actually had read and responded in a meaningful way than 40 drive by comments.   If you see by your stats that your post got a lot of visits but few decent comments if any, then maybe you had bad content and visitors had no idea how to respond.

          Blogging is often an experimental endeavor.   If something does not seem to be working for you then maybe you need to try something else.   The assessment of the quality of a blog's content is ultimately up to what readers are looking for.   If you can't seem to hold onto readers who visit then they must not feel that your content delivers anything that they think they want.  

          If you are pleased with your posts and the traffic your blog gets then maybe you're doing all you need to do.  However if you don't like your traffic, your blog's ability to retain readers, and the lack of interaction from visitors then maybe you need to think a bit more about the content you are delivering.

Frequent Posting

        "Better to have too much than not enough."  That's a philosophy my mother used to have when it came to dinner gatherings and other social events.  This might not be the best idea for blogging though.  Unless you're operating a news blog or a site that requires frequent updates, more than one post per day is probably overkill--you're likely going to wear out your readers and drive them away.

          However it's important to have regular activity on your blog.  Once a month might be okay if you maintain a regular schedule.  Consistency is the most vital aspect to instilling audiences with a sense of expectancy.    If they know when you post then it's easier to turn your blog into a habit.  Random posting might work for some bloggers, but I would recommend a predictable schedule.  If you become accustomed to meeting deadlines then you are more likely to have a readership who knows when to look for your new posts.  When you go out of sight then it's possible that you'll go out of mind and have to make a greater effort to retrieve your lost readers.

         In my opinion, two or three days per week is best for most blogs.  Three of my blogs are only posted once a week and that works well since those are very limited niche blogs.   The key is to pick a regular posting day and time, then plan your posts to go up according to that schedule.  It's easier on your readers and in the long run I think it's much easier on you the blogger.

Should Your Blog Ever Post Daily?

         Yes, during April you should sign up for the Blogging from A to Z April Challenge.   There are some very good reasons for doing so as I outline in the following list:


  • The A to Z Challenge is a blogging event in which many other bloggers will participate.  You can gain greater visibility in participating with others.
  • You can hone your blogging skills in content creation, experimenting with new approaches to blogging, and testing your blog to see what works best for you.
  • There is an increased opportunity to get more feedback on your blog posts.
  • Blogging daily for a month can develop a habit of creating content and functional social networking.
  • The output resulting from participation will provide a good backlog of content for your blog.
  • Participating bloggers can develop strong bonds with others with common interests.  This in turn can be used to mutual future advantage for friendly support as well as business networking.
  • Daily blogging means more writing and more writing is practice that can help make you a better writer.
  • You might even end up with material for a book based on your A to Z content!
       There are many more reasons that you as a blogger should participate in the Blogging from A to Z April Challenge.   If you have never explored the A to Z Blog be sure to visit and read the helpful posts that appear on that site.   If you are having concerns about not having the time, the energy, or the ideas to join us in April I hope you will reconsider.  For every reason not to do the Challenge in April, the A to Z Team members and many other A to Z participants can probably counter with several reasons why you should join us in April.

         Once you've done a Challenge it's easy to get hooked.  It's really the best blogging event of the year!

         What other reasons can you think of to encourage others to participate in the Blogging from A to Z April Challenge?    What are the main benefits you've gotten from A to Z?     What do you think is more important in blogging--quality or frequency?


         




56 comments:

  1. Participate in the Challenge because it's the greatest way to network, make friends, and learn things.
    Frequency should be no more than once a day (although the Geek Twins handle twice a day Monday-Friday well since they are a geek news site) but what matters just as much is the timing. Post at the same time. People like to know when you are posting. And according to everything I've seen on when is the best time to post, you and I post in that prime range of 5-6:00 am Eastern.
    It can take me two hours to put together a post. And I go for a variety of items so there is something for everyone. No, I don't post on deep topics. That's not what I am about. I am entertainment and variety. And if someone can't find something to say or indicate they read any of it, that's their problem. Besides, leaving a comment that has nothing to do with the post is rude.

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    1. All excellent points. Thanks for your contributions in these comments and for all you do. And I heartily agree with you when you say, "leaving a comment that has nothing to do with the post is rude"--that is one of the biggest indicators that a blogger is either just immersed in self-interest or in la-la land.

      Lee

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  2. That's sweet that the A-Z is dedicated to Tina.

    I usually try to post every other day but this winter I've been stuck inside and lethargic due to the blizzards so it's been more infrequent. I think that frequency is important b/c people will lose interest if you don't post enough to pique their interest and memory. On the other hand, like I said, I'm getting annoyed at bloggers who don't make reciprocal visits. I'm very close to cutting a bunch of blogs off my reading/following list for that reason.

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    1. Tina did so much for A to Z and really put her heart and soul into it when she was with us.

      In regard to the reciprocated visits, I have actually gone to some sites on occasion and brought this to their attention in my comment to them. I can understand your frustration, but at the same time some things like job or other obligations a blogger might have that might prevent them from consistently returning visits. I usually use a criteria of what a blog gives to me as to whether I keep visiting. If there is useful or enjoyable content for me then I might continue to visit that blog but just not leave comments. There are many factors involved so I'd evaluate each of those bloggers to which you refer and if you feel there is still something worthwhile between you then contact them direct to see what's going on.

      Lee

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  3. Taking the A-Z Blog Challenge is a good opportunity to find who you are as a blogger. Last year was the second time I participated, but the only year to complete the task. It gave me a sense of new direction of how I wanted to take my blog writing. I'm not necessary all the way there yet, but I'm learning. I HIGHLY encourage anyone missing blog orientation to give this challenge a try. It may open his/her eyes to the truth they seek.

    Quality verse frequency? You know me, I'm not an in-depth kinda gal. I write whatever moves me, but I'm all about the hops for the most part. Good thing or bad, it's just me. I do try to incorporate a personal touch with each post. I think some folks appreciate my form. My blog is still very much a work-in-progress and I'm eager to play along in next month's challenge.

    One thing I do enjoy are the comments and I always love the way you respond so freely at each visit, Lee . I don't get this from everyone obviously just a handful like you. It slightly bothers me because I try to leave more than a sentence when I visit someone's site. Oh well, I try to not judge and go with the punches because really this is about reaching out to others in friendship. Some will take your hand and others...well what can I say...their loss?

    Great points to ponder and call for the A-Z Challenge!

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    1. Thanks for your excellent comment--very valid and informative.

      Different blogs can fulfill varying purposes and yours touches a specific audience. You have regular commenters so I think that says a lot. The real evaluation is the personal one: Are you getting out of blogging what satisfies your needs and do you think it is time that you are spending well for your purposes?

      Lee

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  4. Since I have always blogged 1st and foremost for myself, I'm not in the habit of worrying over what my content will be. I read blogs to connect to people, not for information so much. But I will say the Challenge is a great exercise for your blogging muscles, whether you blog just for fun or for a purpose. I heartily recommend it to everyone.

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    1. Blogging is considered "social media" so you are doing that part and are content with what you are doing. So blog on!

      Lee

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  5. I love A-Z and I'm really going to miss it this year (going away on vaca). I love finding a theme, then all the words, and then all the research, and finally seeing all the themes and words everyone else chose. It's a ton of work but a ton of fun, too.

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    1. You can always preschedule all your posts and then make up for the networking part when you return by joining the A to Z Road Trip to visit bloggers you missed and also reciprocate to all the bloggers who left you comments during April and just let them know your situation.
      But in any case have a nice vacation!

      Lee

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  6. I have it down just fine in my town. And it doesn't matter if you post once a day or once a week. It isn't so hard to get quality content as long as you have the ideas and the willingness to take a few days out and get them done. That way you are ahead in posts(granted some blogs like news blogs can't as they need the new news) and you can take breaks, refresh and then come back with more quality posts. Staying ahead of the 8 ball is key. It also hopes if you have a blog that you can rant on anything and everything going.

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  7. You're right. I think the important thing is to decide what the purpose of your blog is and then set up goals if even just short term. Staying ahead of oneself makes the road ahead look much less impeded and a blogger who does this will rarely get stuck in the stressful last minute situation where they think they have nothing to blog about.

    Lee

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  8. I've learned about the importance of consistency from other bloggers and except for April, I post MWF. A to Z has taught me that blogging three times per week isn't that much of a chore after one frantic month of every day.

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    1. Three times is a breeze for most of us unless we're posting highly researched complicated posts. The biggest effort goes into the networking in my opinion.

      Lee

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  9. In analyzing blogging, there are essentially 3 reasons people read blogs: information, entertainment, or personal connections. (Or at least that's been my experience.) When we keep that in mind, quality content and frequency become a question of audience.

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    1. Exactly--I agree with you completely on your observations.
      We shouldn't expect more return from our blogging than what we are putting into to it and giving to others.

      Lee

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  10. I blog for the friendships made through it and because I work at home so its a good "outlet" to connect with people. I like to build the relationships/friendships up and really get to know a person and do take the time to read the posts one might make. I usually only blog about once a week because of working full time, keeping up with blog reading, other things of life, etc. I did a "fluff" A/Z last year and will do the same this year, not much substance to the posts, but I wanted to spend more time visiting blogs which I always find enjoyable :)

    betty

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    1. Fluff works and in the case of the April Challenge is probably better since so many bloggers are trying to make rounds and don't want to get hung up on thinking about overly deep stuff.

      Lee

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  11. One of the women in my local writers' group posts once a day, sometimes more, and typically has very long posts. Even if she has good content much of the time, it feels too dizzying to have such frequent posts, almost no time for potential new readers, or regular readers, to catch each post before it's bumped down further and further.

    I typically post MWF and Sunday, and used to post on Saturdays (the posts pre-scheduled) when the Sweet Saturday Samples bloghop was still running. I'm still hoping the woman who runs it will reopen it, since she said she didn't have plans to permanently shelve it and just needed a break. A lot of my most-viewed posts don't have many or any comments, and I suspect they're more being used by people doing research for a paper or some such, given the topics (e.g., twilight sleep, my series of posts on The Decameron, Russian names). Some of my posts I do specifically intend more for people doing searches than my regular readers, as I post them during times when less people are blogging or visiting blogs (e.g., summer, late December, early January).

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    1. You have a point about the posts that are used for research. And if you aren't leaving an opening for discussion or offering any questions then I can see how a post might be viewed but not have interaction.

      I do think that too much content can wear out readers and should be avoided unless the blog is intended to be a resource depot.

      Lee

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  12. Quality does not have to be long, but it should stimulate thought or at least a smile or laugh. The funniest jokes are sometimes the shortest. And in this dark world, humor is truly needed.

    I try to post daily, and being a rare blood courier that is somewhat daunting! I try to write daily or at least edit daily as well.

    Bottom Line: whatever is important to us we find the time to do.

    Quality post. :-)

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    1. Totally agree about quality not requiring a lot of length when it comes to blogging. It's not a textbook or epic novel after all! We should go with our feelings, but at the same time weigh our actions with common sense and what we've learned from others. And if something's not working like we hoped then scrap that and try something new.

      Lee

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  13. I once had a daily blog, back in the MySpace days. It got a lot of readers every day but it was pretty labor intensive. I read a while ago that if you post consistently, that's all that matters. Post on set days--every Monday or every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Then visitors know when to expect your posts. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays seem to work well for me...it gives everyone an extra day to catch it. If you post every day, a lot of people will miss about half of your blogs, if not more!

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    1. I started out posting daily and went I switched to my 3 day schedule my visits per post and comment increased because there was more time given to each post. I want posts to be seen and not lost.

      Lee

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  14. Quality is probably a little more important, but it also depends on the purpose of one's blog. Quality doesn't have to be long, either. Elizabeth S. Craig's posts are rarely long and yet there is a lot of good information there. So does Susan Gourley. Hers are probably a perfect length.

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    1. I think often the longer the posts get the more extraneous irrelevant information that gets added. A book or article can get away with that but most blog posts should pack a punch unless you know your readers are looking for and expecting more depth.

      Lee

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  15. What do you mean by "pro" blogger?

    I seem to remember someone (Alex Cavanaugh?) saying in a post once that a blog was essential for aspiring authors.

    I wonder why that is.

    Even with his number of followers (or yours), to top an Amazon sales list, there would have to be far more buyers than that.

    I would think that a blog helps the die-hard fans stay connected, but am not sure i see it as a sales tool. Curious to hear your thoughts.

    But then again, I still listen to vinyl LP's and barely use Facebook and still am not sure why I would want to tweet with anyone (except Charlize Theron but I bet I'm not thinking of the same definition of tweet that you are).

    I would agree though that you are better off posting less frequently and posting things that people want to read.

    And Stephen T. McCarthy will hate this sentiment, and it may have been raised above, , but I also think it is important to keep them short. I spend all day in front of a computer-I don't want to spend all of my down time in front of one.

    Larry

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    1. The usual definition of "pro blogger" is someone who blogs for a living relying on advertising, ad words, and people subscribing to their newsletters or whatever. These bloggers typically blog about blogging or social media. I contrast this with professionals (authors, artists, businesses, etc) who use their blogs as a part of what they are doing in order to connect with their customer base as well as others in their field of business.

      It's recommended for authors to have a blog in order to have greater internet presence for varying reasons (search engine visibility being a main one) since so much business is now internet interactive. Authors can establish rapport with their audience and while adding some credibility to their status as writers. Marketing should be secondary in regards to blogging otherwise the author is going to end up with a dull annoying blog that's all about them with little opportunity to interact.

      And I've mentioned the long posts to STMcC as you know for the reason you indicate. He has some great material, but it's not conducive to broad social interaction with several bloggers--especially if you're a slow distracted reader like I can tend to be. And it was really bad when my computer was really slow and unreliable.

      Lee

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    2. Lee-

      I traded some e-mails with Alex yesterday and this topic came up, and while I am surprised, he confirms that the blog absolutely helps sales, that his first book went on Amazon's best seller list after it was out for a year.

      I absolutely would agree with the rapport-building, but would have thought it was for an existing audience, not so much for generating new sales.

      I was alsu surprised that the majority of his books sales were electronic-I had no idea that the Kindle penetration was so high (even though I get it more for books than for music-you lose sound quality with the typical digital music download, but the bbok on a reader becomes very portable and as I age, the ability to play with font size is a big plus. I still tend to buy the books, only because since the pricing is so similar I feel like I should get something tangible.

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    3. I can see where Alex's blog can help his sales as he does the blog the right way. He has built up a sizable loyal community and with that an author is bound to get some sales. Plus, his reputation allows him more guest blogging opportunities and support from other bloggers.

      To me there's no doubt that the blogging can help sales if you have a highly visible blog and you have gained a high likability factor like Alex has. Still, there is probably much more to be gained in sales from high profile book reviews, media time and placement, and recommendations and endorsements from influential sources (Oprah for example). I don't think a blog can even come close to what those things can do, but still the blog helps and like they say, "Every little bit..."

      I'm not surprised about the E-readers. I don't have one and I still prefer the actual books. But maybe sometime I'll change my tune on this.

      Lee

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  16. I started a blog to create that almighty platform I had heard about. I did not realize how much time I had in that department.

    I look forward to a few blogs I follow. It is just interesting to hear what others are thinking. One thing commonly shared by readers is an interest in more depth than if it bleeds it leads mantra of television and newspaper.

    I think most people have an artist's soul in them. Is it age or artistic desire that sees the profound in the ordinary?

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    1. Maybe a bit of both age and artistic desire in many cases? I'm not sure there is a singular answer to that question as it probably varies according to the individual, their realm of experience, and the quest they are on.

      Lee

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  17. Hi Lee. Since 2006, I've been blogging for me. Strangely, while reading your post and the comments, I realized the very answers I needed. How amazing is that? You and I touched on BOTB last week, I think. The issue of not knowing what to post to support the musical choices. My clueless mind has some answers now. This is what I love about your blog... questions that prompt us. So I'll continue BOTB.

    A second issue is scheduling. Three blogs, two blog-hops... I am seeing light at the end of the tunnel here, and it's not a train! I believe in keeping commitments... so the A-Z challenge was not something I felt I could do successfully, this year. Instead I volunteered to be a minion, for John Holton... observe from the outside this year.

    I'm so excited to be leaving here today with answers!!! I might ought to be reading your other blogs! Thank you (smile).

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    1. Wow, that's the kind of response that I think many of us blog for! And I'm glad you're going to continue doing the BOTB posts. No matter what we do and how we do it, we all have something to add to the mix.

      Lee

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  18. I've tried pretty much everything I can think of to drive traffic to my blog. I would rather have thirty very engaged followers than 500 who don't remember my name and that's what I've been aiming for. After four years, still not. I guess, like everything I write, I fall between.

    I like to stick to blogging twice a week. It gives me deadlines without being too strenuous. If someone I follow posts daily, I generally read just the posts most interesting to me.

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    1. For most of us the only sure thing is the constant interaction of social networking. It takes a lot of time and effort but it does come if you're consistent, persistent, and keep up content that is somehow engaging to readers. I think you are in the right range of blogging frequency and consistency with good posts that are not overly lengthy and have something to say. Relationship building takes time and if you make an impact with a post that really catches readers' attention in that you get the links shared and have people referring back to it then you've hit pay dirt. Still you can't rest on laurels and keep up the blogging grind unless you become so notable that visitors are compelled to come to your site with no social effort from you. That we can dream of.

      Lee

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  19. I'm not sure that either thing necessarily matters all the time. For instance, there was a blog that I -used- to follow because it was supposed to be "so awesome!" and full of all kinds of things for writers. It's the blog of a writer who used to be an agent, and he has a literal horde of followers. But his content was neither quality nor frequent. People still gushed over him. Why? Because it was like, maybe, if they hitched onto his train, he would take them somewhere just by association. I find that is often the way of it.

    Personally, I don't believe in posting "fluff." That stuff is all over the Internet like dryer lint. If I'm going to post, it's going to be about something, even if that something is just something fun (like the recent birthday thing).

    People aren't actually attracted to "quality," though. They want light and easy and, if possible, a list: "10 Things You Can Do To Become a Bestseller!" If your blog requires that people actually stop and think, they will likely avoid it, because thinking is hard.

    Maybe, I'm being cynical, today, but I don't think so.

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    1. No, I don't think you're being cynical at all--you make a good point. Bloggers as well as writers in other mediums recycle stuff all the time because they know it works and people will read it and nod their heads in agreement. I think a good bit of the time we read to reassure ourselves about what we are thinking.

      How many times to we see articles in magazines or elsewhere that basically tell us that to be healthy we need to eat right and get exercise? People want to be healthy so they are attracted to something like this even though they've heard it a million times.

      Same with blog posts on writing or whatever. A blogger's reputation will trump actual content any day--I've seen those blog posts like you're talking about and I've seen them repeatedly and will continue to see them because these types of posts work. I've seen this on my own blog--there are certain types of posts that guarantee interaction and all the better if they've been written well, have a twist, or provide something that seems new to the reader this time that they are reading it.

      And apparently there are readers who like fluff just like there are those who prefer humor or politics. I see fluff pieces seeming to engage their readers all the time so I guess that fits in the blogging for social relationships or whatever. I'm sure I've been a bit fluffy at times myself here at my blog. I want to keep things interesting as well as comfortable for me and every once in a while it's fun to catch readers off guard with a bit of the absurd.

      One of the beauties of blogging is the ability to experiment. The blog is ours to do whatever we wish and whatever makes us happy. And if we're not happy about the results then that's when we need to do the blog analysis to try to understand what we need to do differently.

      Lee

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  20. Frequent post schedules wear me out as a reader. I don't get to spend much time online since all I have is when I'm at work on lunch or breaks. If someone posts more than once a week, I only see their latest content, and will probably miss whatever nice update they had post before last. There are some blogs that I sigh when I see the high number on my reader, because I know there's a lot of their stuff I won't see. Then it stresses me out.

    I'd personally like see a weekly post with quality content. Then I don't feel so overwhelmed.

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    1. Weekly is good, but I think many of us can deal okay with 3 times per week. I don't think I suffer in comments for having posting that often. On the other hand there are some blogs I'll visit that for example might only post #IWSG posts--that's consistent which is good, but the lack of frequency makes them easy to forget about. That's better than those who just randomly post whenever they feel like it which can mean 3 days in a row, then 3 months later, then maybe a Monday in July with the next post a Wednesday in October. If that kind of randomness works for them then okay, but as a reader it's like subscribing to a magazine that comes now and then without me ever knowing when it's going to come. This is why most TV shows typically come on at a certain time on a certain day and will stick to that schedule.

      Weekly with quality is fine when the blog stays with that schedule, but 3 short quality posts per week are okay with me as well. I start drawing the line at 3 or more long posts each week. I usually don't have the time for that.

      Lee

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  21. I think blogging every day for me would get tedious. I'd bore my viewers. And I have a hard time visiting a lot of blogs every day; I miss a lot of my friends' posts because I only want to blog - which includes posting and commenting on other blogs - about three times a week. Social media takes up way too much of my time. Perhaps because I am such a slow reader and take a few minutes to compose a response.

    I've been blogging since 2009 and I think I'm still figuring out my comfortable nicht.

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    1. I have the same social media problem that you describe and I think that is common which is why a blogger is better off with a sizable number of followers who comment when they do visit because all do not visit all the time.

      From the blogger standpoint, yes everyday can get a bit tedious, but it is also good writing exercise. Many pro writers like journalists are writing material that is published on a daily basis. They might not have the same readers all the time, but they still have to creatively come up with new material that has quality. The blogger who can do this is attaining a standard of professional excellency.

      Lee

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  22. I don't have a schedule and never have - I only post when I have something to say, although I understand the benefits of a schedule. Problem is once I write it, I want to publish it straight away. But I'm happy to be getting interaction with a great bunch of followers. Can't wait for the challenge after missing last year.

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    1. And your method works well for many people. That's the way I did it when I first started blogging--although I didn't know how to schedule back then either.

      But I can see what you're saying about wanting to publish right away. I write things ahead of time to post up to a week or more later and I get very anxious for the posts to appear on my blog--almost impatient--but I've learned to wait and I'm happy about the way I do it.

      Everyone's schedule works if that's what they're happy doing.

      Lee

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  23. I love blogging, but I'm currently writing a major project, and I don't have the time to post and visit like I once did. But I'm certainly not going away anytime soon.

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    1. We have to attend to priorities and sometimes blogging takes a backseat if we're not doing it as a vocation. As long as we maintain some kind of presence to let our followers know we're still around then we don't have to go back and rebuild what we've worked hard to establish. I totally understand where you're coming from.

      Lee

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  24. I like quality content more than frequent blogging, in blogs I read as well as my own. I like participating in the April Challenge when I can and if I have a theme, just to force myself to produce a quality set of posts, which seem to continue to get readers worldwide long after the challenge is over. Right now, I'm trying to juggle caregiving, prepping to move, and blogging. Kind of cramps my blogging style, but we do what we have to do. . .

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    1. Blogging takes up time and there are times when we don't have the time to devote to blogging. Hope you can get back to a schedule soon.

      Lee

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  25. Like D.G. said, the posts from A-to-Z can continue to garner readers long after the posts. I still have several A-to-Z posts in my top ten posts in my sidebar, meaning they're still getting visitors. Those posts are three years old! Also, blogging about my interests ended up putting me in contact with people descended from folks I blogged about. I heard from relatives of Clay Allison, as well as someone writing a book about Natalie Wood who had a different viewpoint from most of the articles online about her. As a wild west buff, hearing from relatives of Clay Allison was exciting!

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    1. A to Z builds a backlog of content and if that is quality content it increases your blog value as well as the value of you the blogger. I've also heard from people who have found something that's appeared on my blog on Google. It's always kind of exciting to get a comment on an older post from someone who knows me or is familiar with something I've discussed in a post.

      Lee

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  26. I post weekly, so the A-Z Challenge will be interesting for me. I'm working on a novel, so I spend much of my writing energy on that. I feel ready, however, to take on a bit more and to add focus to building audience. My social media and marketing skills are weak, and I need to strengthen them if I am going to find readers...hence the challenge!

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    1. A to Z can do wonders in strengthening weak social networking skills if you work at it and pay attention to what's happening. A huge time is not required either. Work smart at it and you can make huge strides forward in building a networking presence and gaining more knowledge to be used in the future.

      Lee

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  27. i can't believe I'm too late to sign up. The linky is closed. Rats. Well, good luck with this years A to Z folks.

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    1. I'm not sure what you were seeing but the Linky is not closed. It's open until April. Maybe you should try again?

      Lee

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  28. Maybe it is wrong of me but I post and blog because I enjoy it. I don't want to feel like I am being criticised for how I write and that may well be wrong but if I start to think that way, I begin to feel nervous or not doing things well. I try to blog on a regular basis but time, health, life gets in the way. As for the A to Z-I started last year just to try. I was really nervous but I enjoyed myself and found people who write about their writing, novels, life, film, art, music. I think both can apply-I have seen people write daily and they have something to say and others may only blog once a month but it still is great to read. The key is to have fun, write or do what you enjoy, be respectful and kind to the other bloggers and don't feel intimidated. This can happen

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    1. There are no steadfast rules in blogging. There are many reasons why people have a blog and many ways in which they blog. If what you're doing works for you and you are content with the results then all is well.

      I agree that one should have fun blogging and if they aren't having a good time then they should figure out why and what they should do about it. My post is mostly aimed toward those who are dissatisfied with the efforts they put into blogging and wondering why they don't have the number of visits and comments that they would like to see.

      I think you a blogging the right way because you enjoy it and you do what you can with blogging without making it a big stressful thing. Keep doing what you're doing.

      Lee

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Lee